The Thrift Store Adventure Writing Prompt

The Thrift Store Adventure Writing Prompt

Every item has a story: The true story of where the item was acquired, who owned it, and where it traveled, and the story you are inspired to write about the item.

This is an Adventure Prompt. However, this is not the television show Mission Impossible, starring Peter Graves, Barbara Bain, and Greg Morris, a popular series from the late 60’s to the seventies. This blog post will not self-destruct in five seconds.

Even so, we will pretend we are going on a real adventure.

How To Write a Story 101: Character

How To Write a Story 101: Character

You are going to write a story. Yes, today is the day you are going to write a fiction story about someone. Your character and their development through the story is the heart of fiction.

Make your characters real, and your readers will care what happens to them because they can identify and sympathize with the character in a situation.

How to Write a Journal: 6 Tips

How to Write a Journal: 6 Tips

Do you keep a journal? I do. It is how I remember the travels I’ve taken, the life experiences I’ve enjoyed, and the litter boxes I’ve cleaned.

We are writers, and so it is even more helpful for us to journal. Not sure yet? Let me share with you some tips from my journaling experience.

How to Edit Your Story Like a New York Publisher

How to Edit Your Story Like a New York Publisher

You have finished writing the first draft of your story, a version of your whole story from beginning to end. Now it is time to edit, to revise your words to make your story clear and compelling, so the reader will continue reading after the first sentence.

Editing your story might feel like an impossible task, but when you have a strategy to use, you can be confident you can edit your own story and improve your writing.

Whatever you do, do not skip the important step of editing your first draft. According to David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, “Revision is all there is.”

3 Tips for Writing Brilliant Dialogue

3 Tips for Writing Brilliant Dialogue

We talk to tell someone we want them to pass the salt. We talk to ask questions, share feelings, and ask for directions when we are lost. We talk to ourselves in our thoughts, and we speak out loud.

In our stories, our characters talk, too. It is not quite as easy to write dialogue for our characters as it is to have conversations in real life. But if you take time to learn how dialogue works and practice writing it, you will be able to write brilliant conversations that sound natural and move your story forward.