The Write Practice

The Online Writing Workbook

How to Conduct an Interview Like a Journalist

Journalist by Rabble RadioThis week we’re cancelling our normal broadcasting to publish a series about the journalist’s staple: Interviewing.

The interview is the most used tool in a journalist’s bag, from Barbara Walters down to the guy who writes up the local pee-wee football game. They all interview.

Are you a novelist who wants to get deeper into your character’s head? Consider interviewing someone like your character.

Are you considering getting into journalism? You better learn to interview.

Are you a blogger? Why aren’t you interviewing people yet?

I interviewed four experts about how to interview someone (that’s right, interviewed people about how to interview people—very meta). I talked to a lifestyle journalist, a blogger, a local reporter, and a sports reporter. Let’s call them “the panel.”

This week the panel and I will be covering the following topics, one per day:

The Experts

Here’s who the panel consists of:

Porter Anderson spent twenty-eight years in journalism working for some of the nation’s top news sources, including CNN, the Village Voice, and the Dallas Times Herald. Currently, he writes fiction and tweets about the publishing and writing world on @porter_anderson. He also writes a weekly summary of the most interesting publishing news on former Writer’s Digest publisher Jane Friedman’s blog.

Porter’s all-time favorite interview: when Sting (yes, the Sting) walked into his office and said, “I’m not leaving until I tell you everything you need to know.”

Actually, no, that was his second favorite. His first, the legendary interviewer Charlie Rose.

Jeff Goins built a blog from zero to 1,000 subscribers in about six months, but has been blogging for over five years. He has interviewed Seth Godin, Steven Pressfield, Chris Gillebeau, Michael Hyatt, Chris Brogan, and many others. He writes about writing, networking, and social media at goinswriter.com.

Jeff’s all-time favorite interview: Steven Pressfield, author of Do the Work and The War of Art, two fantastic books about creativity you need to be reading, as well as the novels Gates of Fire and The Legend of Bagger Vance.

Marissa Villa has been working in journalism for eleven years, much of that for a bilingual weekly where she reports on the local happenings of San Antonio.

Marissa’s all-time favorite interview: she doesn’t remember and feels terrible about it (but not too terrible, just the right amount of terrible).

Morgan Lee is a self-described “sports fanatic,” and has been writing about sports professionally for ten years. He edits the sports section for accessnorthga.com, the go-to website for sports information in North Georgia.

Morgan’s all-time favorite interview: the star of University of Georgia’s 2004 defense after they beat Georgia Tech (Georgia won). In a swarm of ten reporters, Morgan elbowed in and asked his question.  “He loved the question,” says Morgan, “began smiling, and we were able to complete a pretty insightful interview for the next two minutes. ”

I guess that’s the key: ask questions that make your interviewee smile.

Tor Constantino worked in radio and print journalism for eleven years. He  was a reporter/anchor at five different radio stations, two national radio networks and two affiliate TV stations (confession: I don’t really know what an “affiliate TV station” is, but it sounds cool). He currently blogs about life and communication at The Daily Retort.

Tor’s All-Time Favorite Interview: George H.W. Bush. That’s the first one, not the second, in case that name causes you to involuntarily throw up.

PRACTICE

To prepare for a week full of learning about interviewing, let’s start with a small and self-centered exercise.

Email your best friend. Ask them one little question. “What did you think of me when we first met?”

Tell them you’re doing it on assignment from the Write Practice, and when they get back to you, post their answer in the comments. We’d love to hear what they think.

About Joe Bunting

Joe Bunting is a writer and entrepreneur. He is the author of the #1 Amazon Bestseller Let's Write a Short Story! and the co-founder of Story Cartel. You can follow him on Twitter (@joebunting).

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  • http://www.thecolorsofmysoul.com/ Lena Toporikova

    My best friend and I met online back in 2006. He hardly remembers his first impressions of me, probably because neither of us has ever expected this online communication to develop into something big. We live in different countries, so it took some time before we could meet in person which finally happened in 2009. By this time we have already been good friends, yet as he claims, he was very nervous on the day of my arrival, and the moment he saw me on that day coming out of the airport building he was thinking that it couldn’t be possible that this girl in a purple t-shirt and with funny ponytails had really come all the way there to visit him. He was impressed by my courage and bravery though he confirms that I did not look especially courageous in these first moments. And according to him the moment I spoke and we resumed the conversation from the day before he realized that I was that kind of the person who would always stand beside him in good and bad times. As he assures me I have never proved him wrong.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      What an amazing story, Lena!

  • Lena Toporikova

    My best friend and I met online back in 2006. He hardly remembers his first impressions of me, probably because neither of us has ever expected this online communication to develop into something big. We live in different countries, so it took some time before we could meet in person which finally happened in 2009. By this time we have already been good friends, yet as he claims, he was very nervous on the day of my arrival, and the moment he saw me on that day coming out of the airport building he was thinking that it couldn’t be possible that this girl in a purple t-shirt and with funny ponytails had really come all the way there to visit him. He was impressed by my courage and bravery though he confirms that I did not look especially courageous in these first moments. And according to him the moment I spoke and we resumed the conversation from the day before he realized that I was that kind of the person who would always stand beside him in good and bad times. As he assures me I have never proved him wrong.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      What an amazing story, Lena!

  • bella tran

    I have a question. Am I supposed to post my friend’s reply or the summary of his reply? Coz it says “Write a summary of their answer” in the e-mail I’ve received, while it says “post their answer in the comments” here on this page! ^^
    Thanks!! :)

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Great question, Bella. Sorry for the confusion. Go ahead and write a summary. That way you’ll get practice processing their thoughts and rewriting them as if you were writing a magazine or newspaper article.

      • bella tran

        Thanks for your reply, Joe!! And here’s the result I’ve come up with:

        “It didn’t take my friend long to learn how predictably unpredictable and indecisive I was. He also quickly learned that I was older than he first guessed, that I loved creativity and making things look pretty, and at the same time, liked doing somewhat crazy things, as well as how generous, caring and willing I was to serve others by giving them first chance even at a limited food supply.

        He also said that he learned a lot more than that over time, but those were things from the first time we met not long ago.”

        That’s it! :D

        I have another question though. Is there any way I could get notifications of your reply via e-mail or something? Coz I actually was expecting one sent to my inbox, or else I thought there’s not yet a reply from you until I came back to this page and found it posted here 14 hours ago, well, 15 now! Thanks again, Joe!! :)

        • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

          Hey Bella. Nicely done! It sounds like it was a nice little interview.

          Yes, there is a way. So at the top of this comment application is a little button on the right that says DISQUS. When you click that, it says, Edit Profile. When you click Edit Profile, there’s a botton on the left that says Notifications. On that page there should be a box to check to get email notifications.

  • bella tran

    I have a question. Am I supposed to post my friend’s reply or the summary of his reply? Coz it says “Write a summary of their answer” in the e-mail I’ve received, while it says “post their answer in the comments” here on this page! ^^
    Thanks!! :)

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Great question, Bella. Sorry for the confusion. Go ahead and write a summary. That way you’ll get practice processing their thoughts and rewriting them as if you were writing a magazine or newspaper article.

      • bella tran

        Thanks for your reply, Joe!! And here’s the result I’ve come up with:

        “It didn’t take my friend long to learn how predictably unpredictable and indecisive I was. He also quickly learned that I was older than he first guessed, that I loved creativity and making things look pretty, and at the same time, liked doing somewhat crazy things, as well as how generous, caring and willing I was to serve others by giving them first chance even at a limited food supply.

        He also said that he learned a lot more than that over time, but those were things from the first time we met not long ago.”

        That’s it! :D

        I have another question though. Is there any way I could get notifications of your reply via e-mail or something? Coz I actually was expecting one sent to my inbox, or else I thought there’s not yet a reply from you until I came back to this page and found it posted here 14 hours ago. Thanks again, Joe!! :)

        • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

          Hey Bella. Nicely done! It sounds like it was a nice little interview.

          Yes, there is a way. So at the top of this comment application is a little button on the right that says DISQUS. When you click that, it says, Edit Profile. When you click Edit Profile, there’s a botton on the left that says Notifications. On that page there should be a box to check to get email notifications.

  • http://pollywogcreek.blogspot.com Patricia W Hunter

    After we moved into this rural community over twenty years ago, Joyce was one of the first to welcome me at the church we attended at the time. She remembers noticing my peaceful and kind demeanor, and thinking that she would love to be my friend; but it was at least ten years later before life circumstances for both of us provided the time and opportunity to develop the best-friend relationship we have today.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Great job, Patricia!

  • Patricia W Hunter

    After we moved into this rural community over twenty years ago, Joyce was one of the first to welcome me at the church we attended years at the time. She remembers noticing my peaceful and kind demeanor, and thinking that she would love to be my friend; but it was at least ten years later before life circumstances for both of us provided the time and opportunity to develop the best-friend relationship we have today.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Great job, Patricia!

  • http://KatieAxelson.com/ Katie Axelson

    The day we met is a very clear blur of activity. I remember distinct snapshots and in them was no room for first impressions. We were too worried about finding room for all of the stuff we’d each driven a double-digit number of hours. Life was moving fast and the stuff was flying as we arranged and rearranged our pot-luck closet of a dorm room. After five years, she remembers labeling me as a Northerner who was a bit crazy and not shy. Perhaps she just told me how she labels me now rather than how she did then. To be fair, I don’t remember either. Well, other than the sigh of relief when I realized she was not Deaf. There was only a minimal language barrier and conversation started almost instantly among the chaos, a conversation that has continued to China and back five years later.

    Katie

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      There are two stories here that I would love to hear. First, why did you think she was deaf?! And second a conversation to China and back?

      • http://KatieAxelson.com/ Katie Axelson

        1. I thought she was Deaf because she said she was majoring in ASL and when we exchanged phone numbers, she only sent me text messages. I didn’t really think she was Deaf but it was a possibility. Our alma mater has a great Deaf and hard of hearing support program.
        2. She and I went to China this past summer to teach English to English teachers.

        • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

          1. Ah, I see.
          2. Nice! That must have been interesting.

  • http://KatieAx.blogspot.com/ Katie Axelson

    The day we met is a very clear blur of activity. I remember distinct snapshots and in them was no room for first impressions. We were too worried about finding room for all of the stuff we’d each driven a double-digit number of hours. Life was moving fast and the stuff was flying as we arranged and rearranged our pot-luck closet of a dorm room. After five years, she remembers labeling me as a Northerner who was a bit crazy and not shy. Perhaps she just told me how she labels me now rather than how she did then. To be fair, I don’t remember either. Well, other than the sigh of relief when I realized she was not Deaf. There was only a minimal language barrier and conversation started almost instantly among the chaos, a conversation that has continued to China and back five years later.

    Katie

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      There are two stories here that I would love to hear. First, why did you think she was deaf?! And second a conversation to China and back?

      • http://KatieAx.blogspot.com/ Katie Axelson

        1. I thought she was Deaf because she said she was majoring in ASL and when we exchanged phone numbers, she only sent me text messages. I didn’t really think she was Deaf but it was a possibility. Our alma mater has a great Deaf and hard of hearing support program.
        2. She and I went to China this past summer to teach English to English teachers.

        • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

          1. Ah, I see.
          2. Nice! That must have been interesting.

  • Melinda Williams

    I suppose this says a lot about my best friend (who is also my cousin) and our relationship. Although we’ve been related since my father married his aunt, we didn’t spend very much time together until a few years ago.
    He claims he found me to be an amazing person because I watched cartoons, which he later discovered was technically called ‘anime’. And he believed the fact that the cartoons I watched came from Japan only added to my coolness factor. On a side note, TJ believes that we simply ‘clicked’ because I am awesome. I believe we’re both awesome and that is what truly makes us best friends.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Hahahaha! I love it. Yes, you’re right. This does say quite a bit about your cousin. Thanks Melinda.

  • Melinda Williams

    I suppose this says a lot about my best friend (who is also my cousin) and our relationship. Although we’ve been related since my father married his aunt, we didn’t spend very much time together until a few years ago.
    He claims he found me to be an amazing person because I watched cartoons, which he later discovered was technically called ‘anime’. And he believed the fact that the cartoons I watched came from Japan only added to my coolness factor. On a side note, TJ believes that we simply ‘clicked’ because I am awesome. I believe we’re both awesome and that is what truly makes us best friends.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Hahahaha! I love it. Yes, you’re right. This does say quite a bit about your cousin. Thanks Melinda.

  • http://www.theycallmekeeks.com/ Kristen Keyser

    My best friend’s words were short and simple in her email response to me: “I thought you were sad, but deep. Very deep. I had to know you.” Elle met me while my family was going through the last stages of my dad’s cancer “battle”. We’ve known each other for sixteen years now. And our friendship is very deep, very rich and full of hope.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Beautiful.

      • http://www.theycallmekeeks.com/ Kristen Keyser

        Thank you, Joe.

  • http://theycallmekeeks.com/ Keeks

    My best friend’s words were short and simple in her email response to me: “I thought you were sad, but deep. Very deep. I had to know you.” Elle met me while my family was going through the last stages of my dad’s cancer “battle”. We’ve known each other for sixteen years now. And our friendship is very deep, very rich and full of hope.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Beautiful.

      • http://theycallmekeeks.com/ Keeks

        Thank you, Joe.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dhogan2 Dan Hogan

    I first met my best friend Shauna, when I was in fourth grade. She had just moved in across the street from me. She could tell right away we were going to be great friends. “I could tell we were going to be friends for a long time, simply because we lived across the street from each other,” she said. Shauna went on to talk about how we had similar personalities as well, “I thought you were quiet and kind of shy like me.” SInce when we first met I was playing with my toy dinosaurs and wearing a Pokemon hat, she knew we had similar interests as well. “You liked dinosaurs and Pokemon, thats pretty much a given!”.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      “You liked dinosaurs and Pokemon, thats pretty much a given!” HA! I love it. A friendship based on shared values ;)

  • http://www.facebook.com/dhogan2 Dan Hogan

    I first met my best friend Shauna, when I was in fourth grade. She had just moved in across the street from me. She could tell right away we were going to be great friends. “I could tell we were going to be friends for a long time, simply because we lived across the street from each other,” she said. Shauna went on to talk about how we had similar personalities as well, “I thought you were quiet and kind of shy like me.” SInce when we first met I was playing with my toy dinosaurs and wearing a Pokemon hat, she knew we had similar interests as well. “You liked dinosaurs and Pokemon, thats pretty much a given!”.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      “You liked dinosaurs and Pokemon, thats pretty much a given!” HA! I love it. A friendship based on shared values ;)

  • Robb

    I met my best friend when I sold him and his now wife (my sister-in-law’s sister) some tickets to a local sporting event. One of the players on the other team was going to pass a career milestone so his date felt really bad about taking the tix:

    “The first words to describe you that came to mind were extremely gracious. Even though it was a “big game” you reiterated that we shouldn’t think twice of using the tickets and to go have fun. I remember your sense of humor and laughter, so I knew you were a social guy that I could sit down with and talk to for a while. Your love of sports was obvious in what we were talking about and the clothes you were wearing, so again I thought, “this is my kind of guy.”

    He then talked of the 2nd time we met when we went to a baseball game and its been a great friendship ever since: …I hit the head of the lady in front of us, trying to make the “Safe” sign with my arms, and we cracked up about it after she forgave me was one of the highlights in our relationship. Our sense of humor and love of sports has carried us a long way!”

    Crazy to think that if him and his wife didn’t get married that I probably would’ve never saw him again! How awesome is that?

  • Robb

    I met my best friend when I sold him and his now wife (my sister-in-law’s sister) some tickets to a local sporting event. One of the players on the other team was going to pass a career milestone so his date felt really bad about taking the tix:

    “The first words to describe you that came to mind were extremely gracious. Even though it was a “big game” you reiterated that we shouldn’t think twice of using the tickets and to go have fun. I remember your sense of humor and laughter, so I knew you were a social guy that I could sit down with and talk to for a while. Your love of sports was obvious in what we were talking about and the clothes you were wearing, so again I thought, “this is my kind of guy.”

    He then talked of the 2nd time we met when we went to a baseball game and its been a great friendship ever since: …I hit the head of the lady in front of us, trying to make the “Safe” sign with my arms, and we cracked up about it after she forgave me was one of the highlights in our relationship. Our sense of humor and love of sports has carried us a long way!”

    Crazy to think that if him and his wife didn’t get married that I probably would’ve never saw him again! How awesome is that?

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  • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

    My best friend’s answer surprised me. I was expecting something negative because of how different we were when we first met and how he acted toward me at that time. Instead, he said:
    “When we first met, I thought you had life altogether. I figured that you didn’t struggle with things that we ‘mere mortals’ do. I thought you had a plan and were going places. It was a bit intimidating, but I looked up to you and wanted what you had.”

    He knows me better now. :-)

    • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

      We met during high school (we were both homeschooled). He was a farmer’s son who loved working on tractors and raising steer. I was a “geek” who enjoyed computer programming and reading and pretty much avoided fresh air. I was a struggling Christian, he was a devout atheist. Our sisters became close so we saw each other from time to time over the next 5 years and at some point I started considering him a friend. It was about 10 years after we met, though, that our friendship became close, due to some shared struggles.

      Looking back, my first impression was that he was a pompous jerk who, as the baby of the family, was quite spoiled. He really impressed me, though, when fresh out of high school he landed a job that probably paid better than his father had ever earned. This was especially impressive since, according to state law, he never even finished high school. Today, he serves those around him with a fervor that few would aspire to, a marked change from the boy I met in high school.

      Today, I look up to him and strive to live up to his example.

      • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

        Wow. That’s a really cool story, Nate. Thanks for sharing that.

        • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

          Thanks, Joe!

  • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

    My best friend’s answer surprised me. I was expecting something negative because of how different we were when we first met and how he acted toward me at that time. Instead, he said:
    “When we first met, I thought you had life altogether. I figured that you didn’t struggle with things that we ‘mere mortals’ do. I thought you had a plan and were going places. It was a bit intimidating, but I looked up to you and wanted what you had.”

    He knows me better now. :-)

    • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

      We met during high school (we were both homeschooled). He was a farmer’s son who loved working on tractors and raising steer. I was a “geek” who enjoyed computer programming and reading and pretty much avoided fresh air. I was a struggling Christian, he was a devout atheist. Our sisters became close so we saw each other from time to time over the next 5 years and at some point I started considering him a friend. It was about 10 years after we met, though, that our friendship became close, due to some shared struggles.

      Looking back, my first impression was that he was a pompous jerk who, as the baby of the family, was quite spoiled. He really impressed me, though, when fresh out of high school he landed a job that probably paid better than his father had ever earned. This was especially impressive since, according to state law, he never even finished high school. Today, he serves those around him with a fervor that few would aspire to, a marked change from the boy I met in high school.

      Today, I look up to him and strive to live up to his example.

      • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

        Wow. That’s a really cool story, Nate. Thanks for sharing that.

        • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

          Thanks, Joe!

  • Kayt Kennedy

    I met Beth one sweltering summer day when I needed a break from the drunken hilarity of the cook-out at the Maryland army post where my then-husband was assigned. As I dragged my lawn chair to the shade of a tree to read the book I had brought just for this purpose, Beth was setting up her lawn chair under a nearby tree. Two loners with books in hand recognized our self in the other, pulled our chairs together, and began what would become a decades-long friendship.

    Beth says she remembers my being intellectually curious, delightfully irreverent, insightful, and out-of-the box in my thinking. I say she was describing herself.

    Feeling stifled by her roles as mother of two young sons and wife of a doctor, Beth chose to honor herself by going back to school, becoming a psychotherapist, and having a thriving 30-year practice. She did this without the support of her then-husband whom she divorced and while raising five children. Beth was on the leading edge of the feminist revolution.

    • Kayt Kennedy

      After posting: I realize that instead of summarizing Beth’s first impression of me, I buried it in the middle of a description of her–as though I were beginning an interview with her. Oh well, it’s good practice.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Sounds like a fascinating woman, Kayt. This was great.

  • Kayt Kennedy

    I met Beth one sweltering summer day when I needed a break from the drunken hilarity of the cook-out at the Maryland army post where my then-husband was assigned. As I dragged my lawn chair to the shade of a tree to read the book I had brought just for this purpose, Beth was setting up her lawn chair under a nearby tree. Two loners with books in hand recognized our self in the other, pulled our chairs together, and began what would become a decades-long friendship.

    Beth says she remembers my being intellectually curious, delightfully irreverent, insightful, and out-of-the box in my thinking. I say she was describing herself.

    Feeling stifled by her roles as mother of two young sons and wife of a doctor, Beth chose to honor herself by going back to school, becoming a psychotherapist, and having a thriving 30-year practice. She did this without the support of her then-husband whom she divorced and while raising five children. Beth was on the leading edge of the feminist revolution.

    • Kayt Kennedy

      After posting: I realize that instead of summarizing Beth’s first impression of me, I buried it in the middle of a description of her–as though I were beginning an interview with her. Oh well, it’s good practice.

    • http://joebunting.com Joe Bunting

      Sounds like a fascinating woman, Kayt. This was great.

  • http://www.facebook.com/johns.bridget Bridget Fawcett Johns

    I asked my husband what his first impression of me was. I started going to the church that he’d been going to for a few years. He saw me, thought I was cute, and asked me out.

  • http://www.facebook.com/johns.bridget Bridget Fawcett Johns

    I asked my husband what his first impression of me was. I started going to the church that he’d been going to for a few years. He saw me, thought I was cute, and asked me out.

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  • Amy Miyamoto

    This was a great exercise on many levels.  I actually sent the request to two friends who originally met me when we were teenagers.  So it was interesting to see what their initial impressions were of me then – considering we have stayed great friends and are now all over 40.
    The first friend who, although we live in different cities, I would consider my best friend today said…

    ” I remember you having a very bright light-like energy.  As you now know
    my environment was very dark and as a kid I was drawn to your light,
    your blondness, the cheerfulness in your voice.  I think I was a little
    intimidated as it seemed like you had for lack of a better term “your
    shit together” but that didn’t last long as you were so generous with
    your life and family.  I remember thinking you were an example of a
    normal person (whatever that means now…maybe well adjusted?) and you
    felt like a safe person.  Big hearted, generous, inclusive.”

    The second, is also a very close friend and this was her first impression when I moved to her school in junior high.

    “You were very warm and friendly.  I found you open and accepting.
     Another word that comes to mind is uncomplicated.  You weren’t drawn
    into the angsty, teenage drama.  There was a simplicity and
    straightforwardness to you that was so appealing.  There was also a bit
    of mystery in that you had come from a different town and that was a different
    world.  I think I thought you were more sophisticated.”

    And there you have it.  Thanks for the opportunity to “play” with this exercise. ;)
    Amy

  • Amy Miyamoto

    This was a great exercise on many levels.  I actually sent the request to two friends who originally met me when we were teenagers.  So it was interesting to see what their initial impressions were of me then – considering we have stayed great friends and are now all over 40.
    The first friend who, although we live in different cities, I would consider my best friend today said…

    ” I remember you having a very bright light-like energy.  As you now know
    my environment was very dark and as a kid I was drawn to your light,
    your blondness, the cheerfulness in your voice.  I think I was a little
    intimidated as it seemed like you had for lack of a better term “your
    shit together” but that didn’t last long as you were so generous with
    your life and family.  I remember thinking you were an example of a
    normal person (whatever that means now…maybe well adjusted?) and you
    felt like a safe person.  Big hearted, generous, inclusive.”

    The second, is also a very close friend and this was her first impression when I moved to her school in junior high.

    “You were very warm and friendly.  I found you open and accepting.
     Another word that comes to mind is uncomplicated.  You weren’t drawn
    into the angsty, teenage drama.  There was a simplicity and
    straightforwardness to you that was so appealing.  There was also a bit
    of mystery in that you had come from a different town and that was a different
    world.  I think I thought you were more sophisticated.”

    And there you have it.  Thanks for the opportunity to “play” with this exercise. ;)
    Amy

  • ShelleyD

    Addie and I have only been friends for about four years, but she’s the one friend who’s not afraid to tell me the truth. Here’s what she said.You and Ed make a striking couple. Your stature commands attention and a smile and laugh that puts people at ease right away.  You make friends easily, which is no easy task.   You are genuine, no pretending.

  • ShelleyD

    Addie and I have only been friends for about four years, but she’s the one friend who’s not afraid to tell me the truth. Here’s what she said.You and Ed make a striking couple. Your stature commands attention and a smile and laugh that puts people at ease right away.  You make friends easily, which is no easy task.   You are genuine, no pretending.

  • http://www.onedesk.com/features/requirements-management/ Requirements management

     In a swarm of ten reporters, Morgan elbowed in and asked his ques­tion.  “He loved the ques­tion,” says Morgan, “began smil­ing, and we were able to com­plete a pretty insight­ful inter­view for the next two minutes. ”

  • Clairelily2001

    I thought this was a clever way to begin to learn interviewing skills as my weakness in interviewing is asking the difficult questions, and I could think of nothing more difficult than asking a friend to comment on me.

    Denise presents as the
    ideal girl-next-door type, pretty, a stylish dresser, married with children, and
    a part time child care worker.  Yet beneath
    the wholesome exterior is a complex person, a gifted artist and a person with a
    strong ethical sense.  I must admit to
    some trepidation when I opened her email in reply to my question.   

    Denise
    and I met at Art college.  She said that initially, before we met, she saw me around the studio and my grey dust jacket brought back happy childhood memories.  When she was a child her parents in their
    positions as Secretary and Treasurer of the local Show society, wore the same
    dust jackets, as did the judges in the equestrian competitions, and she loved
    horses.  The Show was always on the weekend
    of her birthday , so it was an especially happy time.  She remembered me as being kind and generous,
    which I think is a high honour, and that we shared a sense of the ridiculous
    and had a lot of happy moments.  She
    remembered particularly a morning we spent planning a performance piece, and the various dramas leading up to our final exhibition which was highly successful.  Denise won a major award for one of her exhibition pieces and it set her on her path of creating delicate porcelain pieces reflective of her love of the ocean, yet reminding the viewer of the fragility of the natural world.

  • Clairelily2001

    I thought this was a clever way to begin to learn interviewing skills as my weakness in interviewing is asking the difficult questions, and I could think of nothing more difficult than asking a friend to comment on me.

    Denise presents as the
    ideal girl-next-door type, pretty, a stylish dresser, married with children, and
    a part time child care worker.  Yet beneath
    the wholesome exterior is a complex person, a gifted artist and a person with a
    strong ethical sense.  I must admit to
    some trepidation when I opened her email in reply to my question.   

    Denise
    and I met at Art college.  She said that initially, before we met, she saw me around the studio and my grey dust jacket brought back happy childhood memories.  When she was a child her parents in their
    positions as Secretary and Treasurer of the local Show society, wore the same
    dust jackets, as did the judges in the equestrian competitions, and she loved
    horses.  The Show was always on the weekend
    of her birthday , so it was an especially happy time.  She remembered me as being kind and generous,
    which I think is a high honour, and that we shared a sense of the ridiculous
    and had a lot of happy moments.  She
    remembered particularly a morning we spent planning a performance piece, and the various dramas leading up to our final exhibition which was highly successful.  Denise won a major award for one of her exhibition pieces and it set her on her path of creating delicate porcelain pieces reflective of her love of the ocean, yet reminding the viewer of the fragility of the natural world.

  • Aaron DC

    Ok so I asked a friend and here is what she said:

    Is this a trick question???
    And… When did we first meet? I think I’d seen you before I met you…

    I have clarified why I am asking and look forward to her reply…

  • Aaron DC

    Ok so I asked a friend and here is what she said:

    Is this a trick question???
    And… When did we first meet? I think I’d seen you before I met you…

    I have clarified why I am asking and look forward to her reply…

  • Annoyed

    This article didn’t tell me squat and didn’t help.

  • Annoyed

    This article didn’t tell me squat and didn’t help.

  • Robyn

    I know I have come to this exercise late but better late than never.
    My dear friend Sue says she thinks we met about thirty years ago. That makes me stop and appreciate the friendship we have shared. She remembers our first meeting clearly as I was interviewing her for a job. She was nervous but so was I – it was the first time I had ever interviewed someone. She remembers how my welcoming smile put her at ease and how she wanted the job so we could work together. She says my friendly nature had us chatting like old friends. I think it was the other way round. It didn’t take me long to realise she was perfect for the job.

  • Robyn

    I know I have come to this exercise late but better late than never.
    My dear friend Sue says she thinks we met about thirty years ago. That makes me stop and appreciate the friendship we have shared. She remembers our first meeting clearly as I was interviewing her for a job. She was nervous but so was I – it was the first time I had ever interviewed someone. She remembers how my welcoming smile put her at ease and how she wanted the job so we could work together. She says my friendly nature had us chatting like old friends. I think it was the other way round. It didn’t take me long to realise she was perfect for the job.

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