The word of the week is:

Indubitable

adjective:

  1. unquestionable; too evident or apparent or impossible to be doubted.

Here is an example from The Drunkard by Guy Thorne

The Bishop in the Chair now read a few brief statements as to the progress of the work that was being done. Lady Harold Buckingham was down to speak next. She sat on the Bishop’s left hand, and it was obvious to the audience that she understood his next remark.

“You all have the printed programme in your hands,” said the Bishop, “and from it you will see that Lady Harold is set down to address you next. But I have—” his voice changed a little and became uncertain and had a curious note of apprehension in it—”I have to ask you to give your attention to another speaker, whose wish to address the Meeting has only recently been conveyed to me, but whose right to do so is, in my judgment, indubitable. He has, I understand from Father Joseph who has brought him here, something to say to us of great importance.”

There was a low murmur and rustle among the audience, as well as among the semicircle of people on the dais.

The name of Father Joseph Edward attracted instant attention. Every one knew all about him; the slight uneasiness on the Bishop’s face had not been unremarked. They all felt that something unusual and stimulating was imminent.

PRACTICE

Write for five minutes, using the word “indubitable” as frequently as you can. When you’re fin­ished, post your practice in the comments section.
Also, extra credit if you use the word of the week in your daily practice!

Boy shouting

Shout by fotologic

My Practice
“Mu-um!”
Jonathon was trying to get my attention but I was busy.
“Mu-um”
At my desk were the remains of a play. Not my play. Actually was it a play at all? I was to make it into a play without songs but it had been a musical.
“Mu-um!”
Thwack, a pile of papers just landed in a heap as my desk collapsed. Freaking Mary Poppins, was all I could think, I bet she’d be able to make a play out of this, see to Jonathon, bake a cake and be CEO to the world.
“Mu-..”
“What is it Jonathon?”
“I’m stuck”
“kay”
“Mu-um!”
The singy-songy rhyme of it made me think. Before Mary Poppins was a musical it was a book. Maybe I could make a play from a book more easily than a film script. I mean I am sure in the book if there was the cheeky chappy Bert, chimney sweep he wouldn’t say words like ‘indubitable’, speaking of which. I had better find out how literal the ‘stuck’ is Because sure as eggs is eggs, Jonathon indubitably will be really stuck rather than homework stuck.

Joe Bunting
Joe Bunting
Joe Bunting is a writer and entrepreneur. He is the author of the #1 Amazon Bestseller Let's Write a Short Story! and the co-founder of Story Cartel. You can follow him on Twitter (@joebunting).