4 Essentials for Writing Memoir That Resonates With Readers

4 Essentials for Writing Memoir That Resonates With Readers

How do you write memoir and tell a story that is compelling to you, but might not be to your reader?

Boredom is death for a writer and must be avoided at all cost. When writing memoir, the facts of a person’s life will fall short if that’s all you have to offer. You need something more if you want the story to come to life in the heart, mind, and imagination of the reader.

A Killer Reading Strategy That Will Make You a Better Writer

A Killer Reading Strategy That Will Make You a Better Writer

In his classic memoir On Writing, Stephen King writes, “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.” The latter is, of course, what this blog is all about (writing a lot). But I’m convinced that most writers ignore the former: reading a lot. (Or at the very least, they don’t read thoughtfully.)

If you’re like most people, you bounce from book to book haphazardly. What you read from month to month and year to year is simply not something you carefully consider.

But if you call yourself a writer and your goal is to become a better one, you do yourself a great disservice by not reading voraciously and thoughtfully.

How to Write a Fight Scene Readers Will Love

How to Write a Fight Scene Readers Will Love

If your story involves one or more fight scenes, you have a great opportunity. You can thrill your audience, change the course of the plot, and reveal new depths to your characters . . . or you can bore your viewers to tears, and make them wish that the battle would please just end already.

I’m going to give you six tips for writing better fight scenes, so you can keep your audience on the edge of their seats while giving a whole new level of depth to your story and cast.

5 Steps to Get Amazing Feedback From Beta Readers

5 Steps to Get Amazing Feedback From Beta Readers

When you’ve finished a book, you feel like a hero. The work may have some warts, but it’s yours, and it’s done! The next step is to test it out on some readers and see how well the book works. This is called Beta Testing (or just “beta-ing”) your book.

Reader feedback can teach you a lot, but it can also be hard to filter the signal from the noise. The key is learning how to process that feedback so you can make productive edits. Today I’ll teach you how I learned to do this.

Why You Should Consider Writing With an Omniscient Narrator

Why You Should Consider Writing With an Omniscient Narrator

“Don’t write third person omniscient.” That’s a piece of advice often echoed by editors, publishers and agents alike. But being the rebellious creatures they are, as soon as authors hear someone tell them what they must do, they get an itch to do the exact opposite.

But before you “stick it to the man” and start drafting your magnum opus in third person omniscient, let’s look at some examples of when that perspective is best used and discover why the industry often favors “closer” points of view.