How to Use Parentheses

How to Use Parentheses

Parentheses are punctuation marks that look like curly brackets. They are used in pairs and can contain phrases, clauses, or even complete sentences. Let’s look at some ways to use them more specifically.

Euphemism: Literary Definition and Examples for Writers

Euphemism: Literary Definition and Examples for Writers

Euphemistic language is everywhere in polite society, used to speak and write sensitively about taboo subjects or to tackle difficult situations.
Parents sometimes refer to “the birds and the bees” as a euphemism for sex when speaking to their kids.
Euphemisms can make it both easier and harder to talk about uncomfortable topics, so they can be used in interesting ways in literature.

What is Stream of Consciousness? Definition and Examples

What is Stream of Consciousness? Definition and Examples

“Stream-of-Consciousness” is a literary technique that focuses on sensory details, what we see and hear and feel and think in the moment. It’s usually written in incomplete sentences that jump around as they please. It’s the type of writing that tells you to completely forget everything else you’ve learned about writing and give in to the flow of ideas.

What is an Allegory in Literature?

What is an Allegory in Literature?

Allegory is one of those literary terms you’re pretty sure you learned about in school, but it can be difficult to put it into words. So what is an allegory in literature? Today you’ll be able to define it and identify allegory in some well known examples whether you’re studying allegory for school or for your own writing!

Subtext Examples: 7 Simple Techniques to Supercharge Your Scenes

Subtext Examples: 7 Simple Techniques to Supercharge Your Scenes

As writers, we are always working to make our stories the best they can be. One of the more advanced techniques that can help you do this is by giving an underlying meaning in a scene—otherwise known as subtext. 

In a story, subtext  can be implied by the surface action and dialogue.

When you think about the books and stories that you most enjoyed reading, chances are that story’s scenes were woven with something deeper than what appeared on the surface.

Today I’d like to teach you seven simple techniques for using subtext in your story, which I’ll also teach with some subtext examples. 

Can You Use Whose for Inanimate Objects?

Can You Use Whose for Inanimate Objects?

Today, Joe brought my attention to a strange quirk of the English language: we use “whose” for inanimate objects. It sounds so weird when you use the phrase like, “I placed the iPhone whose screen is broken in the bin,” but it’s technically grammatically correct.