Parts of Speech: The 9 Types of Words You Need to Write In English

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What is a part of speech? In this article, I define the grammatical term, part of speech, list the nine parts of speech, and describe each one using examples. Finally, I give a creative writing exercise to help you cement your knowledge of parts of speech immediately.

Definition of Parts of Speech

Parts of speech describe the nine types of words based on how they function in a sentence, including nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, articles, conjunctions, interjections, and prepositions.

Full List of Parts of Speech

There are nine parts of speech:

  • Noun
  • Pronoun
  • Adjective
  • Verbs
  • Adverbs
  • Articles
  • Conjunctions
  • Interjections
  • Prepositions

Ready to practice using the parts of speech? Let's put this lesson to practice with the following creative writing exercise.

PRACTICE

To practice using all nine parts of speech, use the following writing prompt:

A child is trying to choose and then purchase a gift for his or her mother. Using all nine parts of speech, write for fifteen minutes about the child's decision about the perfect gift.

When your time is up, go back and check to make sure you have all nine parts of speech. Then, post your practice in the comments section for feedback. And if you post, be sure to give feedback to at least three other writers.

Good luck and happy writing!

Alice Sudlow is the Editor-in-Chief of The Write Practice and a Story Grid certified developmental editor. Her specialty is in crafting transformative character arcs in young adult novels. She also has a keen eye for comma splices, misplaced hyphens, and well-turned sentences, and is known for her eagle-eyed copywriter skills. Get her free guide to how to edit your novel at alicesudlow.com.

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