Stop Feeling Like an Imposter

by Joe Bunting | 48 comments

Do you ever feel like a writing imposter? Like you're just faking this writing thing, waiting for everyone to figure out you have no idea what you're doing?

imposter

I challenged my friend, author S.J. Henderson, to write a poem a few days ago. She took me up on my challenge, wrote a poem, and it turned out beautifully.

But she said something interesting afterward, something I recognize in my own thoughts about my writing, something almost every writer I know deals with. Here's what she said:

I feel like an imposter.

Sound familiar?

Because I think most of us feel like that at some point in our writing. I certainly do, sometimes daily.

What do you do when you're passionate about writing, when it fills your soul, and yet when you feel like you're just faking it? What do you do when you feel like you'll never live up to the writers you admire and respect?

Why You Shouldn't Feel Like a Writing Imposter

Writers, I've found, are very sensitive to shame.

Shame is, at its core, the belief that you don't belong, that there's something essentially wrong with you, and that you'll never be able to be part of the group because of that essential flaw.

Shame is the fear of being exposed, that if you are exposed, you will be rejected.

But what is writing except exposing the deepest parts of yourself? Since writing is such a vulnerable activity, writers come up against shame constantly. There's no avoiding it.

The “imposter” thoughts constantly follow:

  • I'm a sham
  • I can't write poetry
  • I'll never write something great like my favorite writers
  • I'm not a real writer
  • I'm just faking it
  • My writing is worthless

And so on.

3 Steps to Dealing With Imposter Writer Syndrome

The inescapable reality is that if you want to be a writer, you will feel shame. Everyone feels shame, but writer's are particular susceptible to it. It's just part of the job.

And the worst part is there's no quick-fix to shame.

But here are three tips to dealing with that feeling of being an “imposter” writer:

1. Identify It

First, just recognize your feelings. When you get that feeling like you got punched in the gut or someone poured a bucket of ice water over your head, make the connection, “Oh, I'm feeling shame right now.”

2. Endure it

Next, endure it. Even though you may feel like you would do anything to not feel like this, the hard truth is that you can't distract yourself out of shame.

And if you try to distract yourself as a way to avoid feelings of shame, you can potentially do long-term damage to your creativity (creativity and vulnerability are closely linked).

Instead, feel your feelings. Breathe them in. Breath them out. Let them exist, even as they rip you up inside.

3. Replace It

Shame is the belief that who you are is not good enough.

Obviously, that's a lie, because you are awesome.

You can be a great writer.

You aren't a sham, an imposter, or just faking it.

You are an artist. You are beautifully and wonderfully creative.

And, most of all, writing is supposed to be fun! Stop taking it (and yourself!) so seriously.

Don't give in to the lie, replace it with truth.

You Aren't An Imposter

We all feel like imposters. Even the great writers do:

F. Scott Fitzgerald felt like an imposter.

J.K. Rowling felt like an imposter.

Earnest Hemingway felt like an imposter.

George R.R. Martin felt like an imposter.

We all feel like we're faking this writing thing so much of the time. You can't avoid it.

But you can live with it. You can overcome it. You can write anyway.

Let's do it together.

Have you ever felt like an imposter as a writer? Let us know in the comments.

PRACTICE

Stop taking writing so seriously. Today, write something silly. Write the silliest thing you've ever written.

It doesn't have to make sense. It doesn't even need to have punctuation. It just needs to be fun, a lot of fun.

Write something silly for fifteen minutes. When your time is up, post your practice in the comments section. And if you post, be sure to give feedback on the silliness level of your fellow writers.

Have fun and happy writing!

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Joe Bunting is an author and the leader of The Write Practice community. He is also the author of the new book Crowdsourcing Paris, a real life adventure story set in France. It was a #1 New Release on Amazon. Follow him on Instagram (@jhbunting).

Want best-seller coaching? Book Joe here.

48 Comments

  1. rosie

    Er, surprisingly I haven’t felt like an imposter ever. But I wrote every day since I was about fourteen, so maybe that’s a cure to shame?
    The best way to feel like a writer is to write, I think.

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      Agreed, Rosie, and great that you’ve never felt like this! I hope you won’t look down on those of us who aren’t as lucky.

  2. Rick Escamilla

    Joe,
    With writing like this, you and anyone else that uses the word is an IMPOSTOR, which is the correct spelling of the word since the sixteenth century (1580). That illiterate Americans have bastardized the spelling of the word, so that today both appear in the dictionary is ludicrous. And your expansion and continuation of this error is cause for me to begin doubting your supposed expertise. You may have a point as to the feelings one gets, but if those feelings come from someone who clearly is an impostor who can’t spell the word impostor, those feeling are well-deserved and they should learn to spell In order to stop being IMPOSTORS.

    Reply
    • Cath

      You might want to take a second look at your own writing, which has several errors in punctuation, relative pronouns, and capitalization, before you take to castigating others for their mistakes. Point well taken on the correct spelling of the word, but that does not obviate the valuable contributions Joe and his colleagues are making to writers anxious to hone their craft. Just a thought from a fellow imposter!

    • Rick Escamilla

      Dear,Cath;

      Im glad you got the point that spelling in the internet sucks and supposed writing expert sites should strive to always use correct spelling in order to stop the proliferation of bad spelling so prevalent in the English speakingwriting internet as my newly found friend Lilac took offense at the post so I left her a reply and I thought it only fair to leave you one as well I Hope I did not misuse relative pronouns or missed any words that should be capitalized or perhaps capitalized some you think shouldnt have been have you ever read the declaration of independence it is riddled with so many capitalized words that one wonders why the founders did that using todays grammar rules on it I did have a split infinitive but your keen editing eye should find it instantly and you can send me another note on my poor usage Here is a few punctuation marks feel free to insert then wherever you think they should go I know the slash goes between speakingwriting but Im not sure where the rest go help me out would you

      , , , , , , , . . . . . : : : : ! ! ? ? ‘ ‘ ‘ “ “ “ “ /

      Ps I am not sure if I left enough punctuation marks so use some of yours and let me know how many you used I will pay you back I promise really you might have a colon or semicolon left over so break them up and use them individually instead of stacked up like they are same thing with the double quote marks split them up and use them as apostrophes thank you so much.  I went ahead and gave you the end period so you’d know I was done

    • LilianGardner

      Take it easy Rick. We’re all in the same boat. Please comment on my post and say what you like. have fun!

    • Rick Escamilla

      I did

    • Lilac

      Just because a spelling differs from the “original” spelling does not
      mean it is any less valid. I’m not sure if you’re aware, but language
      does not stay stagnant over time. Both forms are commonly used. The
      ratio of usage of impostEr to impostOr on the English-speaking internet
      is 6:5. Language is meant for COMMUNICATION, and if a spelling form
      conveys the concept of the word, it serves its function. One would think
      that apt usage of words to create meaning is more important than
      pretentious nitpicking over etymology.

    • Rick Escamilla

      Deer Lilak:

      Eye hop ur smert enuff ta git da menin uf dis.

      Da rizon booth farms er exceptibl know, ees bcuz edeots who kant spil er so previlint een da iliterat inglish spikin enternet dat the error is bcom exceptible bi defolt.

      Jest bcuz booth wards ees comonly uset know duz not min at sum paint in hiztury it wuz konziderd rong until edeots sech as da iliterat inglish spikin enternet has rogt startid mispelin carp.

      Eet ees edeotek. 2 rongs dunt mak a rat.

      Butt, U gut mi,

      Your rite! Their korekt booth farms er exceptibl!

      Spelins, longs it conbeys da konzept uf da ward, ees god comunicatin!

      I gets eet know!

      Padon mi.

      I wastid ell mi edumicatin. 2 much fluoride, me thinks.

    • Lilac

      Noebody spelz dis baddly. You cannot compare it to a mere switch of an “e” and an “o.” Butt eef teh jeneral populaytion did speek lyk dis, then yess, it would be valid communication. I take it your education didn’t include any linguistics classes, or maybe you would be aware that nonstandard dialectic forms exist. Consider yourself lucky that you got to grow up in a bourgeois environment which allowed you to foster your intelligence and learn “book smarts”. If you’d like to show off, please take it elsewhere bc we can’t possibly be as smart as you.

    • Rick Escamilla

      For want of a nail, the shoe was lost…
      For want of an “o”, the language is lost…

      Evidently, no one is assmart as you! Keep trolling, toots!

    • Claudia

      Where I live, the words imposter and impostor are both correct.

  3. Marcy Mason McKay

    Sometimes, I feel like I have a PhD in “not good enough” as a writer. I’m trying to change that. Earlier this week, I posted the following quote, “No one is you and that is your power.”

    It was a photo (that I can’t get it to post here), but I LOVE the sentiment. I’m trying to remember that I struggle with Book #2 in the Burger Heaven series. Thanks for bringing this dark topic to the light, Joe. m3

    Reply
    • EmFairley

      Love the quote, Marcy! It is so true!

  4. Sarah Riv

    I hate this feeling. I’ve been so bogged down lately. I don’t feel any spark anymore. Writing has become a chore. I’m trying to keep on writing and I’m hoping this will pass. Since I’ve been stressing so much about it it’s no wonder that I’m not having fun but still. Shouldn’t you love what you do and do it everyday? Sometimes I think I’m not cut out to be a writer and I’m just pretending.

    Reply
    • The Almighty

      I get those feelings too!
      But a good can of tea and some music always gets me back up again. 🙂

    • Sarah Riv

      I need to make a good playlist that both calms me down to write and revs me up so I can keep writing.

    • Margaret Stephens

      Sarah, I’ve been feeling this for awhile. I haven’t come up with a cure yet, but as with the ‘shame’ written about above, am trying to just endure and ride through it. Let me know!

    • Sarah Riv

      Exactly! I’m thinking it’s Fear getting in the way since I really want to start moving now. It always has to rear it’s ugly head where it doesn’t belong. Just gotta keep writing!

    • Margaret Stephens

      yes, bc the more I worry aka panic about it, the worse it gets. Better just to push on, try to, anyway, with every paragraph gained a victory….which means I’ve also had to dial down my expectations of myself (which is hard).

    • Sarah Riv

      Extremely hard! I’m a perfectionist so it’s hard to just throw words on the page even if they don’t feel right. But that’s the only thing you can do or else you’ll be staring at a blank page forever. Just gotta work pass all this and write. (which is easy to say but harder to do. Still every word makes it a little bit easier)

  5. The Almighty

    I’ve been waiting for someone to say something like this! It resonates so much with me, especially as a teen trying to find a place in writing.
    At most seminars and workshops I’ve attended, I’ve always felt out-of-place. This whole “impostor” things fits me more in terms of person.
    Although on paper I don’t come off as such, in person I speak with little finess and a lot of color. I’m not much of a reader, like everyone else in teen writing groups at my school, and have no clue about current popular authors. It’s why I don’t share my work at the school groups. They give me weird looks and incredulous stares.
    And my rather disheveled self immediately makes them not take my craft seriously.

    But I love writing.
    And in silence, I will continue to pursue my passion. 🙂

    Keep on writing friends!

    Reply
  6. glsword

    Love the reminder that we all feel this way! I have two published novels, the most recent one has been optioned for a film. I am a real writer. But I fight the “impostor” feeling everyday! Thank you for this post.

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      Thank you for sharing this. I think it’s encouraging to hear other writers, successful writers, are experiencing some of the same feelings.

  7. Madani

    Hi, Joe
    I am Algerian. I speak Fench and Arabic fluently (Arabic being my mother tongue) and I know enough English to read an English novel and understand it and I write-in Arabic and in French, not English of course.
    When I wrote my first novel and sought for a publisher, the very night of that day (i was in bed) a question invaded my mind ‘ O my God! I am imitating D.H Lawrence in his novel Sons and Lovers!
    I had this feeling because my father was a miner and the town where we lived was a town of miners and above all my parents didn’t love each other exactly like the novel of the great writer D.H Lawrence. I have read the book years before writing my novel. I read it in English.
    I searched for the book in French to see wether I had borrowed anything from sons and lovers or not but unfortunatly impossible to find it in neither in France nor in canada.
    My novel is till now fading in my computor.

    Reply
    • Jay Warner

      Put it out there anyway. Don’t worry about your writing being an imitation of anyone else’s writing style, even D.H. Lawrence. It’s your story and it deserves to be shared.

  8. Joyce Hague

    William Zinsser of “On Writing Well,” wrote this: “‘Who am I to say what I think?’ they ask. ‘Or what to feel?’ ‘Who are you not to say what you think?’ I tell them. There’s only one you. Nobody else thinks or feels in exactly the same way.” That has helped me a lot. I hope to be published someday, but I’ve let go of the pressure of that. The competition is fierce, so if I’m published, great. If not, whoever is supposed to read my work will find it. No one can take away my story, my experiences, or my thoughts and feelings, nor can they express them like I would. When we write, we expose our inner thoughts and feelings and that leaves us feeling vulnerable. People like to read transparent words – words that let them know they’re not alone in their struggles and feelings; When we write with vulnerability, that’s a good thing!

    Reply
    • Robert Ranck

      I am simply astonished! Your approach really is from a position of security, not “vulnerability”. Where, on The Eternal Edict of How Things Must Be, is it asserted that writers must be vulnerable or write from points of weakness or must SUFFER writers’ block?

      I’m with you all the way to the vulnerability thingie. From there, I think the opposite is in operation

      Nine decades ago, Dale Carnegie opined that speakers (and that applies to writers too) work best when they speak from what they know best – themselves! Exposing our inner thoughts,(transparency) etc, should leave us with feelings of power. I’m certain that is why those writings of Fitzgerald, Hemmingay, et al, have such a lasting effect on their readers.

      The self-assurance of your first sentences belie any claim to vulnerability, don’t you think – if you reflect upon it?

  9. Ted Alby

    The physicists have it all wrong. Years ago I read an article in that irreproachable journal, The Journal of Irreproducible Results. The visionary author offered an observation that there was no such thing as light. The state we call light is simply the absence of dark. That truth has not been accepted, but then again, neither were Copernicus or Galileo for centuries. Of course, there are several corollaries that go along with that. Among these are the simple fact that heat is simply the absence of cold, and motion is simply the suppression of still. I offer simple proof: When light overcomes dark, heat overcomes cold, and motion overcomes still, one simply has to contemplate how much energy is required to restore the regular state. It isn’t natural. One simply has to look at what is required to restore the natural state of dark, cold and still. Are not coal fired power plants dumping huge amounts of pollution into the atmosphere? How about the dreadful alternative, wind power that interferes with natural movement of air? Worst of all, that dreadful dark and heat sink in the sky that requires NUCLEAR energy to power its brutal disruption of the natural state of cold, dark, and still. Further, the toll that we pay to maintain this unnatural state is beyond question. I would substantiate this by submitting for your consideration, the events following the great blackout in New York in November of 1965. This briefly restored the natural condition of dark and cold, and greatly reduced motion. Nine months later, there was a large spike in childbirth. This proliferation of life was simply a result of the restoration of the natural state. There is, of course much more proof, but I can dwell no further on this topic. I must now begin my quest of other wrongs so that we may spare no efforts to right them. I leave it up to you, the reader, to pursue cold and dark, but in that pursuit, you must forgo motion.

    Reply
  10. Ted Alby

    The physicists have it all wrong. Years ago I read an article in that irreproachable journal, The Journal of Irreproducible Results. The visionary author offered an observation that there was no such thing as light. The state we call light is simply the absence of dark. That truth has not been accepted, but then again, neither were Copernicus or Galileo for centuries. Of course, there are several corollaries that go along with that. Among these are the simple fact that heat is simply the absence of cold, and motion is simply the suppression of still. I offer simple proof: When light overcomes dark, heat overcomes cold, and motion overcomes still, one simply has to contemplate how much energy is required to restore the regular state. It isn’t natural. One simply has to look at what is required to restore the natural state of dark, cold and still. Are not coal fired power plants dumping huge amounts of pollution into the atmosphere? How about the dreadful alternative, wind power that interferes with natural movement of air? Worst of all, that dreadful dark and heat sink in the sky that requires NUCLEAR energy to power its brutal disruption of the natural state of cold, dark, and still. Further, the toll that we pay to maintain this unnatural state is beyond question. I would substantiate this by submitting for your consideration the events following the great blackout in New York in November of 1965. This briefly restored the natural condition of dark and cold, and greatly reduced motion. Nine months later, there was a large spike in childbirth. This proliferation of life was simply a result of the restoration of the natural state. There is, of course much more proof, but I can dwell no further on this topic. I must now begin my quest of other wrongs so that we may spare no efforts to right them. I leave it up to you, the reader, to pursue cold and dark, but in that pursuit, you must forgo motion.

    Reply
  11. Teng

    One of article which pull us back to the basic. Fun is all we want in writing.

    Reply
  12. EmFairley

    Thanks so much for this, Joe! It truly resonates with me

    Reply
  13. LilianGardner

    Joe, thanks for this post; it’s great and the way I feel about my writing. The consolation is that the awesome writers you’ve mentioned felt the same way as we, amateurs do.
    So here goes something silly.

    A consideration from my cat, Minnnie.

    Minnie, my three-year-old grey and white cat sat on the kitchen chair watching my every move.
    “Hey, Minnie,” I said, “why yer watching me?”
    “Ah, I just want to know why yer so frantic,” she replied. “Why yer running here and there, with plates, cutlery, glasses to put on the dining table. Who’s visitng us today?”
    “The Thorburns are coming for lunch but Jules told me only an hour back. You know they’re big eaters and I must prepare a big meal, and a good one, too.”
    “And so, what’s on the menu?” she asked, closing and opening her eyes, while her pupils dilated and narrowed.
    “I’ll make pasta with mushrooms, buy roast chickens, make roast potatoes, green salad, and sliced tomatoes with dressing, and…”

    Here Minnie cut in, “what a fuss,” she said. “What a damned fuss! And all for those greedy Thorburns.”
    “Well, Minnie, what do you suggest I do?” I asked.
    “Just open one or two of my cat food and dish it out.”
    “How can I? They’ll never come for lunch again,” I said, stunned at her suggestion.
    “Exactly!” she said, and jumped off the chair to rub against my legs.

    Reply
  14. Anwar

    It’s interesting regarding the timing of this article. Last weekend, I was feeling every bit of what you are talking about here. I felt that I was only really interested in writing so as I could make money quickly. Also, I thought that my ideas wouldn’t be able to stand up to what’s out there today. After I experienced these feelings, I felt that it would be best to set aside my writing for now. But, as you are letting me know, setting aside the writing because I don’t feel that I’m good enough is a serious mistake. Thanks for the reminder!

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      Great realization, Anwar! Thanks for sharing this.

  15. Robert Ranck

    “As a man thinketh, so is he.”

    “Act enthusiastic, and you’ll BE enthusiastic.”

    These two old maxims ought to be the guiding lights for each one of us who aspires to write. There are others aplenty in the same vein, but those two, shouted out at the top of our lungs each time we sit down to write should suffice the majority of our group.

    Confidence comes with practice, self-awareness in an honest appraisal of one’s output, and a steadfast refusal to accept denigration from others – or one’s own self.

    Please, Joe – stop opening new traps for our creative souls. I never felt the “impostor” thing, until you mentioned it. I considered it a minute, then moved on. That term implies dishonesty, at the least, and most of us write from our own honestly perceived points of view, experiences and thoughts.

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      Fair enough. I use that strategy, and it works… until it doesn’t. You can only cover up and ignore your shame for so long until it expresses itself in some other way. Better to let your shame into the room, hear it out, thank it for its concern, and then use its energy to create something new. It’s great that you’re not feeling like an imposter (where I live, that’s how we spell it, sorry), but that doesn’t mean that you won’t. (And perhaps, if you’re not, you’re not trying hard enough—get enough one-star reviews and then see if that shame doesn’t creep it’s way through.)

  16. Susan W A

    gerber daisies
    upsy daisy
    topsy turvy
    round the curvy

    swing … wheeeee!
    look at meeeeee!
    delight giggle laugh & wiggle

    on a team
    medals gleam
    balls and baskets balls and feet
    lifelong lessons here I’ll meet

    trial and error
    let me learn
    you had yours
    now it’s my turn
    every year I stretch
    for more I yearn

    pencil markings on the wall
    measure measure
    see how tall
    sleep and nourish (food and love)
    next to mom you’ve reached above

    proud proud proud proud
    every day mom says it loud

    in my heart from the start
    my love I send until the end

    Thanks, Joe. Just wrote down the “silly” but keeping it “real-y”.
    I count my blessings that I found The Write Practice at a time when I was trying to challenge myself to start writing creatively on a regular basis and to “put it out there”. My attempts have often been met with sincerely kind comments. I have only written very short pieces (not even a short story), but I heard loud and clear early on at TWP that I get to call myself a writer just the same. I certainly identify with the “Imposter” effect in other areas of my life, but in checking with my internal critic, it seems that I have released a lot of the “IMPOSTER!” self-accusations relating to my writing. I come across so many GEMS on TWP; while I naturally still “compare”, I just appreciate the thought and effort put forth and take the opportunity to learn from others’ work and style, melding some of that into my own work so I can develop my craft.

    Reply
    • Diamond Fox

      Awesome.

    • Susan W A

      Thank you!

  17. Theresa Stolk

    Joe, this hit home. At this particular time. How relieved I am to know that you have identified this particular feeling for me, as lately I have fallen behind with an article I am writing, and need to get a chapter of a book written for a competition I need to enter. Because I needed to get my head around ‘insurance’ for the article, I procrastinated on that, and the shame about not writing my first chapter for this book hit me like a ton of bricks. I felt totally useless, ashamed, and angry with myself, and even started an argument with my partner. I really thought I had dealt with feelings of shame until I read your article. questions I asked myself were: who do I think I am trying to write a chapter, in preparation for a full length book on entrepreneurs. I felt small, and very fake. You reminded me that we write because we cannot not write. Thank you for your honesty, and your truths.

    Reply
  18. Leonie Gerber Burmeister

    I believe you now. Thank you

    Reply
  19. Diamond Fox

    The Chariot

    It awaits me after work
    It is there after my evening tea
    I notice it when I twerk
    I notice it when I eat kimchee
    My friend spotted it while we played spades
    My kids point at the chariot after school
    I wave and smile then it fades
    It vanishes making me look like a fool
    It isn’t a big deal
    It is black and shiny like new
    Is it fake or real
    Is it 2016 or 1862?

    Reply
  20. FritziGal

    F. Scott Fitzgerald said something truly invaluable in a letter he wrote to his daughter back in 1936. He offered a sure-fire way of testing the authenticity of your own words, and he said it so succinctly. To-wit:

    Dear Scottie:

    Don’t be a bit discouraged about your story not being tops. At the same time, I am not going to encourage you about it because, after all, if you want to get into the big time, you have to have your own fences to jump and learn from experience. Nobody ever became a writer just by wanting to be one. If you have anything to say, anything you feel nobody has ever said before, you have got to feel it so desperately that you will find some way to say it that nobody has ever found before, so that the thing you have to say and the way of saying it blend as one matter — as indissolubly as if they were conceived together.”

    Ah yes! That kind of writing could never ring false, nor could it ever be anything to be ashamed of. Best of all, you’ll know when you’ve reached that plateau. For a moment or two, you’ll feel like lightning just parted your hair!

    Reply
  21. Sharon Annable

    I feel like this a lot. I’m working on my first novel and I’ve literally started it over half a dozen times. It never seems to be “good enough” to be “real writing”. What the heck is “real writing” anyway, if I never seem to get there?

    Reply
  22. Taija Sensei

    there is a character in my book(-in-the-making) who says this: “In this world, nobody really knows what they’re doing, there’s only a whole bunch of people pretending to. That’s why people like us, people who can’t pretend, get so confused.”

    I am strongly relating this post to that quote and i’m glad you are expressing this to every writer who thinks they are a fraud. I realized that no one’s really a fraud sometime in high school after watching some documentary about copyright.
    haha

    Reply
  23. Tina

    I’ve felt like an impostor, always. And not just in my writing—although, in being the ‘captain of my ship’ in that regard, I’ve felt the most impostor-like with that. I have to realize, though; that living in New York City as I do, most of the people who have done some great things with their lives have to be impostors at some point in their lives. As a native-born New Yorker, who lived somewhere else on the East Coast for a long time, I’ve been an impostor in (at least) two locations – in terms of sense of place. In terms of vocation, it echoed much of the time, if and when looking for (traditional, regular) work …

    In many instances, I’d been a tough sell; I had not gotten the best jobs in private BUSINESS as a result (not bureaucratic, not having a “corporate America/big business” look or type). High levels of job-applicant rejection, have prepared me for this life!

    One thing I did do, was detach myself from the process …

    Reply
  24. Bob Marshall

    The thing is, to me, that writing just isn’t fun. I feel so self-conscious when I try to write, so much an impostor that I simply cannot touch the keys and ruin the pristine ‘Untitled Document’ with what I know will make me feel ashamed.

    I simply cannot do it, any more than I can make myself younger or taller. I am an abject failure. if I were to write the very same sentences as, say, Neil Gaiman, they would be rubbish.

    Writers are magicians, born to it.

    Reply

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