Literary Crisis: Why a Dilemma Will Make Your GOOD Story GREAT

Literary Crisis: Why a Dilemma Will Make Your GOOD Story GREAT

So you wrote a story or a novel or a book. You’re proud. You’re excited. Visions of publishing dance in your head. Then you go back and read your story or novel or book, and you think, “Well, this is good and I feel proud of it. But it doesn’t match up to the stories/novels/books I know and love.”

You wrote a GOOD story, but not a GREAT one. Worse, you don’t know why. It might be that you’re missing a crisis.

3 Elements of Plot: Dilemma

Lesson 1: Inciting Incident In the first lesson, we talk about the three most important plot elements of best-selling stories, starting with the inciting incident. Continue to the lesson Lesson 2: Dilemma In our second lesson, we explore the dilemma, heart of your...
Dilemma: 4 Powerful Steps to Make Your Characters Choose

Dilemma: 4 Powerful Steps to Make Your Characters Choose

What if there was one thing you could change about your writing that could almost instantly make it better?

There is! There is a storytelling element that I’ve seen as an entrant and judge of multiple fiction contests that makes stories work and win, standing out above the rest.

And that single, difference-making element is a Powerful Choice.

How to Use the Rule of Three in Children’s Books

How to Use the Rule of Three in Children’s Books

Interesting things come in threes. There are three little pigs, not four. Three kittens lost their mittens, Goldilocks and the three bears, three musketeers. You might even say “three is a magic number.”

If you’re a writer, especially a children’s book author, you should be using the rule of three in your writing. In this post, we’ll talk about how.

Can You Use Whose for Inanimate Objects?

Can You Use Whose for Inanimate Objects?

Today, Joe brought my attention to a strange quirk of the English language: we use “whose” for inanimate objects. It sounds so weird when you use the phrase like, “I placed the iPhone whose screen is broken in the bin,” but it’s technically grammatically correct.