Guest Visitor
Sarah Gribble: Becoming Writer, Super Moderator, Story Cartel Course, Editor
Member since May 4, 2016

Sarah Gribble physically resides somewhere in Ohio, but where her mind resides depends on the day. She writes sometimes. She bangs her head against the wall other times. Her short stories have been featured in a variety of online and print publications. You can find her on Facebook and @sarahstypos or connect with her at sarah-gribble.com.

Website: http://sarah-gribble.com

Recent Writing Pieces

If I highlight something, it brings up an option to share the highlighted text on social. Just wanted to see if it’s just me with

Anyone else noticing this? »

To see if anything pops up in the list.

Second test »

This is my awesome something for the group. I’ll await my accolades and awards. This is an edit.

Awesomeness »

Recently Critiqued Posts

(Now, I know we were told to send questions to Joe’s e-mail, but I wanted to play around with this site for a while before

Fake Letter to Joe »

To see if anything pops up in the list.

Second test »

Roses are red Violets are blue The forum’s awesome and your face is too.

Cool Poem #1 »

Hi, im a new and excited writer to be sharing my stories with you all lol their very good and I hope to be publish

Does anyone know a publisher? »

Hey Mod Team, this is my first test post. I hope you like it. “Haiku for Joe” French wine flows in streams The host calls,

Haiku for Joe »

Once upon a time, there was a new forum. The end.

Weekly Short Story – 995 words »

Hi, im a new and excited writer to be sharing my stories with you all lol their very good and I hope to be publish

Does anyone know a publisher? »

Hey Mod Team, this is my first test post. I hope you like it. “Haiku for Joe” French wine flows in streams The host calls,

Haiku for Joe »

Hi, im a new and excited writer to be sharing my stories with you all lol their very good and I hope to be publish

Does anyone know a publisher? »

Hey Mod Team, this is my first test post. I hope you like it. “Haiku for Joe” French wine flows in streams The host calls,

Haiku for Joe »
See Sarah's other Write Practice activity outside of the forums

For years, I didn’t know how I was ever going to sell books. I’m painfully shy and, unfortunately, have a complexion that tends to redden easily. Like lava-covered-tomato red. The idea of calling someone, sometimes even people I know, gets my heart racing. The idea of standing in front of a small group of people and talking is my worst nightmare. And don’t even get me started on going to conferences and the like. Oh, the terror.

None of this is really news for writers. “Writer” and “extrovert” don’t often appear in the same sentence. Day-to-day our hermitic proclivities aren’t really a problem. We happily plug away at our keyboards in a dark room somewhere and don’t have to deal with another soul.

Until we want to sell our books.

How to Sell Books: The Introverted Author’s Guide »

Self-publishing is on the rise, but places like Amazon aren’t marketing platforms; they’re sales platforms. You can’t just upload your book and think it’ll sell. You have to do the heavy lifting to get the word out.

Email marketing is the number one way to connect with your audience, which means it’s the number one way to sell books.

But what should you send to your audience? How do you turn email subscribers into loyal readers?

How to Sell Books Using Email Marketing »

For some of us, engaging on social media is tricky. Writers tend to be introverts by nature, so putting ourselves out there can be intimidating or seem like a useless waste of time. (It’s neither, and you need to be on social media in this industry. It’s just how it works now.)

Then there’s the other side of the coin, those writers that are on social constantly, using it as a procrastination technique to keep from writing. (Don’t do that.)

As a little starter pack, I’m going to give you a few Twitter hints and a list of hashtags that will help you connect with other writers, agents, publishers, and, most importantly, your readers.

How to Sell Books on Twitter: The Twitter Starter Pack for Writers »

What is the first thing you check on a book (after the cover art)? I would bet, whether you’re at the library, at a bookstore, or shopping online, it’s the book description. What does that mean for you as a writer? You need to know how to write a book description, preferably a great one.

Nothing sells a book like a well-written description.

How to Write a Book Description That Will Captivate Readers (And Sell Books!) »

Ever wondered how to write a book like Stephen King? He’s called the King for a reason, and it’s not just his last name. Stephen King has written in just about every genre imaginable, has sold over 350 million copies of his books, and has had work adapted to movies, miniseries, and comics.

Whether you’ve read him or not, you know who he is and I would be amazed if you haven’t experienced his work in some form or another.

How to Write a Book Like Stephen King »

If you want to write a book, you’ll need book writing software that’s up to the task. Yes, you can invest in dedicated book writing

How to Write a Book Using Microsoft Word »

Writing from one person’s perspective is hard enough. Writing from multiple perspectives can seem downright impossible. But it can be done.

I wrote my last novel from three different perspectives. It was difficult. Sometimes it was stagnating creatively. But sometimes it was fun and kept me engaged in my own book when I wanted to give up.

So if you’re ready for the challenge, here’s how to write a book from multiple perspectives.

How to Write a Book from Multiple Perspectives »

Names — character names or the names of people in real life — are a big deal. Parents-to-be pore over baby name books for months looking for that “perfect” name. Even naming a pet can take time. You want the name to be perfect, to mean something, to be unique but not too “weird.”

Naming a character, especially in a longer piece of writing, can be just as agonizing and is definitely just as important.

What’s in a Name? How to Come Up With Character Names »

With warmer weather comes thoughts of escape. Beaches, mountains, and yet-to-be-explored cities call to us. We get that itch, that need to run away and relax somewhere without our bosses nagging us. Or maybe you need to hang upside down on a roller coaster or meet Cinderella. Regardless, it’s vacation time!

For a writer, taking a week or two off from writing can be detrimental. You obviously don’t want to keep up with your 1,000-words-a-day writing schedule, but there are simple ways to feed the muse while on vacation and make it easier slide back into your routine when you return home.

How to Keep Writing While Traveling »

Some of you may be participating in our 100 Day Book program, writing your first novel on your own, or kicking around the idea of starting that manuscript.

Writing your first novel is hard. It’s a struggle. It’s a learning process.

And it’s often autobiographical, even if you don’t mean it to be. And that’s okay.

Writing Your First Novel: How to Fix an (Accidentally) Autobiographical Novel »

Almost two months ago, we started this journey to find out how to publish a short story. We’ve drafted, we’ve gotten feedback, we’ve edited. If you’ve been following along, you should have a completed short story by now. (Mine’s ready. Is yours?)

This week, you’re sending that story out!

How to Publish a Short Story: Submit Your Story »

If you’re following along with our short story publication series, by now you should have a second draft. Now it’s time to get feedback and make that manuscript shine!

How to Publish a Short Story: Get Feedback and Edit Your Final Draft »

If you’re following along with our short story publication series, by now, you should have a publication in mind and have the answers to a couple basic questions. Maybe you brainstormed or did a full outline. Bonus points if you’ve got a draft! (But don’t worry if you don’t.)

Now pick up the pen and write the thing!

How to Publish a Short Story: Write Your First and Second Drafts »

A lot of you have just finished participating in The Write Practice’s 7 Day Creative Writing Challenge. You’re pumped, inspired, enthused. You feel good about establishing a writing habit. Now what?

Now you write a short story and submit it.

This post is the first in a four-part series that will walk you through the process of planning, writing, and submitting a short story. At the end of the series, you’ll have a short story ready for submittal!

How to Publish a Short Story: Find Your Publication and Idea »

Our job as writers is to transport our readers into our stories. A high-octane plot and three-dimensional characters are obviously necessary to accomplish this goal, but so is an immersive setting.

Setting is often overlooked when describing a scene. We all want to move on to the next plot twist and wasting important space on what trees look like will just bore the readers, right?

Wrong.

To draw readers fully into a scene, we need setting. We want them to forget they’re reading and make them experience everything our characters are experiencing.

Sometimes, you can get away with building your setting straight from your imagination. Sometimes, you can’t.

Setting of a Story: 3 Ways Going Outside Can Improve Your Writing »

We’re almost two weeks into 2018 and I’ve already dropped at least half the resolutions I made, and if you’re like most people, you probably have as well.

Resolutions to better yourself are stressful, and even a momentary lapse can make a person want to scream and kick and cry. Perhaps eat an entire pint of ice cream. Perhaps lay on the couch and wallow in self-pity, lamenting over the magnificent writing career that could’ve been if only you hadn’t skipped writing that one day.

Today I’m going to ask you to think about the coming year a little differently, and hopefully renew some of the enthusiasm you may have already lost.

3 Writing Prompts That Will Rekindle Your Writing Enthusiasm »