Which Famous Classic Writer Are You?

by Kellie McGann | 178 comments

Today on the blog, we've decided to have a little fun. We created a quiz that will determine which classic writer you are most like.

Classic Writer

We love these classical writers. They inspire our writing and they teach us more about the craft daily.

These writers set the standards high for us, and we as a community aspire to reach those together. Figuring out which writer we are most like might help us improve and hone our skills a little more. And sometimes we just like to have fun.

Here goes:

Which famous author are you?Β Let us know who you get in the comments below!

PRACTICE

Take a few minutes to take this quiz. Once you've discovered who your inner writer is, do a little research on their writing style. Let us know what you've found in the comments.

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Kellie McGann is the founder of Write a Better Book. She partners with leaders to help tell their stories in book form.

On the weekends, she writes poetry and prose.

She contributes to The Write Practice every other Wednesday.

178 Comments

  1. Beck Gambill

    That was fun! Apparently I’m Ernest Hemingway. Those are some big shoes to fill!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Hemingway is so good! Such big shoes to fill, you got it! πŸ™‚

  2. Katherine Rebekah

    I got Jane Austen. Probably because I picked social justice. Ironically, I do not enjoy romance and subsequently did not enjoy her books, accept for the social statements they make.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Ah, yeah I’m not a huge romance person either. She does make some killer social statements though.

    • Katherine Rebekah

      Oh, yeah. And wonderful female protagonists, too. Which I can relate to.

      Really enjoyed taking the quiz, by the way. Good way to mix things up!

  3. Elena Brabant

    Very cool! I’m Charles Dickens…… )))))))))) Master of characters.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      I got Dickens too! So fun!

  4. nianro

    All right, first offβ€”holy christ those are some gorgeous pictures. They’re probably edited and HDRd out the yazoo, but, damn. I need to get a new desktop background or something.

    When I answered questions with ideal answers (i.e. what I would prefer to be true), I got Charles Dickens. This is interesting, since I usually focus on small groups of characters, rather than the ascapartic casts of characters for which Dickens is known.

    When I answered questions with actual answers (i.e. what is true), I got Ernest Hemingway. This is also interesting. We share a passionate love affair with polysyndeton, but apart from that, my prose style couldn’t be further from Hemingway’s.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      That’s so funny. We do often answer with what we wish to be true versus what is actually true. I love that you tested that theory and got different results!

  5. nikkilady

    I got Jane Austen. I don’t know how it came to that conclusion, but it’s a surprising choice.

    Reply
  6. Jim Aldrich

    Thank you, Kellie. Quite interesting. The result was not what I expected, but the more I thought about it, the more I agreed. My writer? Stephen King! Always about 10 degrees off of normal.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Ha always 10 degrees off of normal. Love it. Embrace it!

  7. Theo Volschenk

    I’m on a massive Stephen King binge at the moment, so no wonder my psyche lured me into the woods where the Constant Writer’s shoes lie in wait… The Voice has spoken!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Theo, that’s so great. Better work on filling those shoes πŸ˜‰

  8. Jeanne Doyon

    I got Jane Austen too. Interesting to think about.

    Reply
  9. clairebear2018

    For some reason the quiz isn’t popping up on my laptop??

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      It sometimes takes a little bit to load. Maybe try refreshing the page?

  10. Debra johnson

    Mine was Jane Austen as well. Hmm I agree with you Jeanne interesting to think about indeed. I can see myself leaning toward her and or that time frame she lived in, with the long skirts and simple living… Always thought my writing role model would have been Laura Ingells Wilder….

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Debra, interesting indeed. We only put in seven different classic writers, Wilder wasn’t in that batch, but next time!

    • Debra johnson

      That’s quite all right. It just serves to show me there are others I connect with as well as expands my reading library….Funny when I listen to the language spoke in that era, I tend to mimic that in my own speech and writing ( at least for a while) much like I begin to talk with a southern accent when around true country folk… ( Festus from gun-smoke comes to mind the most.)

    • Felistus Senwamadi

      I understand that. It happens to me too, I mimic the accents and speech after watching them for too long!

    • Ann Stanley

      I got Jane Austin, and I think it’s because I drink tea. She’s one author I’ve never been able to read. A page in and I’m screaming with boredom and irritation. I much prefer James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Virginia Wolfe, or more modern writers. This quiz is rigged. Give me John Irving, T. C. Boyle, Barbara Kingsolver, or whatever, not Jane Austin. Ugh! I am not like Jane Austin….

    • Debra johnson

      hehe one little discrepancy, and we can be linked with all sorts of writers based on style or likes and dislikes….. its interesting to see similarities of what we share with writers of ol’

    • Ellen ODonnell

      I got Jane Austen drinking coffee. I think the drinkers got Hemingway. I write about love and I think that’s why. I think I’m more Fitzgerald actually

    • JoAnne Macco Silvia

      I got Jane Austen drinking water. I’m okay with that. Wonder how many female authors were available.

    • Nancy Mako

      Yup. I’m another who got Jane Austen. And I drink hot cocoa while writing fantasy, for goodness sakes! Oh, okay, I admit to drinking tea; but it’s iced! πŸ˜‰

  11. Anand Venigalla

    I got Ernest Hemingway. Strange because I much prefer the baroque writing of Hawthorne, Melville, Conrad, Cormac McCarthy, and Faulkner. But hey, I love men stuff, I’m unashamedly heterosexual male, and I like stories about violence and masculinity and energy, so maybe I am most like Hemingway in that sense.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Hemingway is so good! Glad you like your result. Now off to more writing!

    • JAM

      I did as well and I’m a woman. Interesting.

    • Lorna Robinson

      Isn’t it interesting that we thought it strange to get what we did… perhaps it just goes to show that there are many facets to the minds eye:)

  12. crystal johnson

    I got Jane Austen, that’s awesome

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Jane Austen! Yes!

    • crystal johnson

      I was surprised about it because I’m a film student and I written small skits and short essays but I’m new to writing short stories and scripts.

  13. LTZ

    Hmm, I got Mary Shelly.

    Her mini bio corresponds to a lot of what I do, but having just recently heard something new thematically about Frankenstein as well as Bram Stoker’s Dracula, I cannot say I’m terribly proud to be likened to her at the moment.

    I think the quiz did a good job though, as Mary Shelly is seemingly by far the best match from what I’ve read in comments.

    Interesting.

    Thanks in any case for the survey. I would love to see a future edition of this based around 20th century authors.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      LTZ, I’m glad you relate with Shelly. That’s a great idea to do some 20th century authors! I’ll remember that for next time. πŸ™‚

  14. anna-rose phipps

    Mary Shelley is what I got. Not surprised.

    Reply
  15. Carrie Lynn Lewis

    An interesting test, but I do not consider myself like Hemingway in the least. πŸ˜‰ If I were to pick, I’d choose C. S. Lewis.

    There are couple of answers for which I had no answer. Europe, for example. I have very little interest in going to Europe. Alaska, maybe. Europe? No.

    I like all seasons equally well, the thing that inspires me most to write wasn’t on the list, nor was the theme for most of my stories!

    So I took the quiz and had fun, but don’t put much stock in the results!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Carrie, glad you had fun! That was the main goal. Thanks for letting us know your thoughts! πŸ™‚

    • Carrie Lynn Lewis

      I did have fun.

      I did the quiz a second time and ended up with Mary Shelley. I’m not sure what to make of that!

  16. ruth varner

    Well, apparently I have a link to Mark Twain! I’m flattered and I’ll have to take another peak at his writing. Thank Kellie; that was fun! Agree that the photos were outstanding!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Ruth, glad you enjoyed the quiz. Twain is great. What a fun comparison!

  17. ALT Strickland

    I got Stephen King. Not surprising considering I started reading his books as a kid. He is my Dad’s favorite author so I had easy access to his books. I’ve always admired his insights into human nature.

    Amy

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Amy, that’s my dad’s favorite too! He’s so fun to study and imitate in writing. Embrace the style!

  18. Jim Finley

    I got Mary Shelley … interesting for a retired Marine and history buff writing military science fiction. I am pretty liberal and also a retired psychotherapist, so maybe that factored in.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Jim, that’s so interesting! She’s got a little sci-fi in her. Thanks for taking the quiz!

    • Lakshmi Narayan V

      I got Mary Shelley as well. An English Teacher and science aficionado. I have pondered about the beauty and the beast motif much. Not surprised with the result. But it is exciting to know. Good quiz and match.

  19. patrick

    I got Mary Shelly

    Reply
  20. patrick

    Mary Shelley is fine but I am a 74 year old male who writes memoirs but no complaints I loved Frankenstein

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Patrick, Frankenstein is great. Shelley’s style is also really great and interesting. Thanks for taking the quiz!

  21. Eman Ghallab

    I got Mark Twain. I’m new to writing so I’m not sure whether the result is accurate in my case πŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Twain is great! Embrace it πŸ™‚

    • Eman Ghallab

      Thanks Kellie. Since I’m a complete beginner to writing, what’s your advise for me to start. I feel overwhelmed. I appreciate your recommendation.

    • Kellie McGann

      Practice, practice and more practice. You’ll learn as you go. Don’t get discouraged if it’s hard in the beginning. So glad you’re writing. We need more writers in the world. πŸ™‚

  22. Michael Cipolla

    Stephen King. I normally write something like romance, but there is a bit of mystery. Not much like his stories in genre or skill level. I need much more practice. Much more.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Well in the words of Stephen King, ‘If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.”
      So yes, practice. πŸ™‚

  23. Mirel

    Interesting. I took the quiz twice, supplying different answers for the questions where I had more than one possible answer, and ended up both times as Stephen King. I don’t think my writing resembles his in any way: not genre, not style, not sales, but fun quiz nonetheless. Thanks!.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Mirel, Thanks for your thoughts, it was mainly for fun πŸ™‚ Glad you enjoyed it!

    • Mirel

      Sure, now I’ve got something to live up to…

  24. Honeybrown1976

    I got Ernest Hemingway. Funny, considering I tend to write about women and their hidden darkness against a world of Mary Sues. Interesting.

    Reply
  25. Eric Pulsifer

    I wanted Hemingway — ex-journalist, tight prose, working standing up at a typewriter — but got Stephen King instead. No problem; I write dark stuff.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Hemingway is one of my favorites! But dark stuff and Stephen King go together πŸ˜‰

  26. simplysimon2

    Hemingway. People on the street in NY identify me as him so there is a physical resemblance. I prefer his earlier work, more of a prose poet.

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      Do you follow his hobbies too? Boxing, bullfighting, fishing, big game hunting? I like his early work too. In Our Time is fantastic.

  27. Debra johnson

    I have 2 beautiful long skirts I wear when I write westerns and other type stories,, it gets me in the mood. Always thought I was born to late,,,, should have been born during “Little house on the Prairie” time…

    Reply
  28. Claudia

    Stephen King. Great storyteller and one who clearly exhibits generosity of spirit. I’ve read many of his books, some of which certainly offer a second read or more. Not necessarily one of my favourite authors but certainly an interesting writer. I found 11/22/63 to be one of King’s great novels. It was just a super read. Loved it.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      His books are so hard to put down. I just got his “On Writing” book and hope it’s just as awesome as his novels.

  29. Carolyn

    I got Jane Austin whom I just love!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Yay for Austen! She’s so great.

  30. Kellie McGann

    Right? Who would turn down being compared to Jane Austen. I accept, every time. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  31. I'm determined

    I got Jane Austen and it fits me to a (cursive script) T! The intricacies of human relationships, behavior – in whatever setting – have always drawn my interest. And – where my interest lies – there my plots assemble, even in outer space.

    Reply
  32. Natalie

    YES! I got Mary Shelley, who’s one of my favorite writers! πŸ˜€

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Yay! That’s so awesome. Glad you got her! She’s great!

  33. Syed Gohar Lal Akram

    Wow! Mark Twain.
    Although I am crazy about Charles Dickens!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      I got Dickens, but both are SO GOOD. So fun!

  34. Ar Jain Espinosa

    Jane austen, i like it

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Yay for Austen! I’m a huge fan!

  35. meg

    I got Mark Twain what an honour that is. A lot to aspire to as a Writer!

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      It’s so fun comparing ourselves to these writers so we can aspire to greater things! Love it!

  36. Reagan Colbert

    I got Charles Dickens… Not sure why! Love this!

    Reply
    • Joe Bunting

      I love Charles Dickens!

    • Kellie McGann

      I got Dickens too! It was so fun!

  37. Dymondgrl

    I got Hemingway, which did not entirely surprise me as we both wrote/write in the same style- in my writing classes, I was always told I wrote “more masculine” than like my own gender. Ha.
    I wish Baudelaire would’ve been on this list; he is my most beloved author. I’ve read his poetry (translated from French) and a book written about his life called “Black Venus”, which was so good, I literally cried when it was over- I wanted more. We share a few things in common: our general disdain for societal rules, loving an IMPOSSIBLE lover for years and writing about taboo subjects in the most intricate way possible. Interesting quiz, though- well done.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      I love Hemingway! Thanks for the suggestion, we’ll keep that in mind next time! πŸ™‚

  38. Casey

    Jane Austen. I love relationships.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      No surprise there then! Love it!

  39. Daria Tarrant

    “You got Ernest Hemingway! He’s an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. He had an adventurous life. Notable works include A Farewell To Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea.”

    I thought this to be very interesting as Ernest Hemingway is one of my favorite authors. I read The Old Man and The Sea while in high school because it was required reading and fell totally in love with his works and kept asking my teacher what else did he write so I could read more.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      It’s hard not to fall in love with Hemingway and his works. So awesome you got him!

  40. kath

    WHat?! Stephen King? Why? That was so random πŸ˜› I have never managed to make it through any of his books except On Writing…

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Kath, I just got his book On Writing and am SO excited to read it!

    • kath

      Oh, it’s an amazing memoir! Enjoy it!

  41. clairebear2018

    I got Jane Austen!

    Reply
  42. Christian O'Connor

    I got Mary Shelley, which just strikes me as odd. I wish I could have said that I enjoy writing in a cabin in the woods, but the fact is that I would just be too excited and would have to run around like a little kid.

    Reply
  43. Christian O'Connor

    I got Mary Shelley, which strikes me as odd. I wish, for one of the questions, that I could say I prefer to write in a cabin in the woods. The fact is, I would be too excited and have to run around like a little kid, just enjoying the place.

    Reply
  44. simplysimon2

    I am the anti-Hemmingway though I have been accused of resembling him. I am a Beat Documentary Poet into Love, Harmony and Beauty.

    Reply
    • Kellie McGann

      Ha does that mean you got Hemmingway in the quiz?

    • simplysimon2

      Yes.

  45. Sam

    Dickens! Very interesting!

    Reply
  46. L

    I got Mary Shelley. Not a surprise since i write stories “off the cuff”. Preston and Child, Anne Rice and Stephen King are my favorite writers.

    Reply
  47. Douglas Newton

    I got Stephen King, though I like Ernest Hemingway. Wow, That’s inspiring! Thanks for this quiz. Now let me go and restart my writing so I can finish my debut novel in 2016.

    Reply
  48. R.Aller

    I got Ernest Hemingway- never read any of his writings but this has got me curious and I will definitely add his writings to my to-read list. My favourites though are Charlotte Bronte, George Eilot & Elizabeth Gaskell. And I think that is mostly because of the social matters they introduce in their writings.

    Reply
  49. Fetzy 11

    I got Jane Austen! Nice!

    Reply
  50. Elizabeth Westra

    I got Virginia Woolf, but I don’t know much about her, nor have I read any of her books.

    I guess it’s because I’m independent, and like to have my space and alone time, like it seems she did.

    Reply
  51. Penelope Queue

    Well, I chose “home” as my favorite place to write, but I basically live in an abandoned cabin in the woods, soooo… ? :D:D:D

    Reply
  52. Allynda Casterton

    I got Stephen King! That’s almost right. Personally I don’t think I write like anyone. I’m currently working on my first mystery/romance/thriller. I don’t think Stephen King has written one of those yet; has he?

    Reply
  53. Kiki Stamatiou

    I’m mostly like Charles Dickens. Like him, I mostly write about suffering and social injustice in the world. This is especially true not only with my fiction, but with nonfiction and poetry.

    Reply
  54. Jo March

    I got Ernest Hemingway, and I don’t know if I should be surprised or not, honestly. I love authors like Stephen King, for somebody more modern. For someone older, I’d say Charles Dickens or Jane Austin. I love Louisa May Alcott though, if you couldn’t tell from my name. Little Women has been my favorite book since I was in elementary school. Frankly, I haven’t read anything by him yet, and I couldn’t be a fitting judge for the comparison. However, if the previous commenter is right about Hemingway being about violence, masculinity and energy, I suppose I may write about similar subject matter at least. Oh well, from what I’ve read, quite a few people didn’t understand their results based on their taste in literature. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that most authors wouldn’t read only their own novels.

    Reply
  55. Kelley madick

    Jane Austen. hammer hit nail on the head

    Reply
  56. Renee

    I got Mark Twain! It’s cool that way because I adore Mark Twain! Although I prefer SCI-FI, and fantasy, whereas he wrote more of adventure and coming of age…..

    Reply
  57. amola italiana

    stephen king

    Reply
  58. Charleston

    I got Hemingway. HavenΒ΄t read him yet but definetely am planning to! I love the roaring twenties and have always thought that I was born a century too late (should’ve been 1892 instead of 1992). I also write alot of songs and Cole Porter is a huge inspiration for me and I had so much fun reading The Great Gatsby. I definetely share the humour of that day and age!
    Which writers were included in this furthermore?…

    Reply
  59. Crystal Johnson

    Got Jane Austen

    Reply
  60. Justine McGrath

    Mary Shelley???!!

    Reply
  61. Miyuki

    Jane Austen! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  62. Anna Glover

    Weird that I got Stephen King….lol.

    Reply
    • ErikaDonaghy

      I feel the same way… especially because I’m too scared to read much of his work!

    • Anna Glover

      Same here πŸ™‚

  63. Hindra Saputra

    Yahooo !! Yes !!!! I got my favourite author of all time Jane Austen. Mr. Darcy, you’re my man !

    Reply
  64. Karen Tomsovic

    I got Austen, too. Wouldn’t have thought, as I write contemporary. But then again, I suppose she was considered contemporary for her time.

    Reply
  65. J. S. Pan

    I got Mary Shelley. I got to know a new writer!

    Reply
  66. disqus_CMD

    Virginia Woolf!

    Reply
  67. S.Ramalingam

    Recently I stumbled upon an e-book that described in detail about the writing process followed by some eminent writers such as Ernest Hemingway,Tony Morrison, and host of other writers.Among them, a particular writer, I cannot exactly remember her name, yes, you are right, the said writer is she, impressed me most, because, she stopped reading classics and the latest novels etc, while she was deeply immersed in her current work.Because, she reasonably apprehended that she might be influenced by any particular classic or modern writer.That impressed me most.Though we may be indebted to our yesteryear writers, I too don’t want that my writing get influenced by any particular writer.I want to be what I am when I write, but not to be a replica of anybody.By that way I don’t mean to insult any classic or modern writer.

    Reply
  68. LilianGardner

    I’m Jane Austen, which suits me beautifully. I love her writing and books.

    Reply
  69. Riff

    I got Mary Shelley. Apparently she loved travelling, but I hate going outside! Learning about different places is interesting, though.

    Reply
  70. Rachel Parks

    I got Stephen King! It makes sense, as I tend to write thrillers with crime or horror. Lovely quiz!

    Reply
  71. collie

    Jane Austin? Really?

    Reply
  72. Read Kimberly Jayne

    Welp, looks like I take after Stephen King. This shouldn’t surprise me, I guess. I do enjoy writing dark, thrilling stories with mystery and mayhem. (I also write romantic comedy, which I love.) And I’m currently writing a dark fantasy. Others have compared my work to Anne Rice, so I would say I’m in good company! If only I was in King’s tax bracket! This was fun.

    Reply
  73. emmalewis

    I got Mark Twain, which surprised me somewhat! Glad I didn’t get Jane Austen…

    Reply
  74. Gary G Little

    Stephen King!? Really!? I have never sat down and read anything by him. Nothing. Nada. No short story. No novel. I generally do not care for any movie that has been made from one of his stories.

    Stephen King!? Really!?

    Hockey puck. I’m going back to my Heinlein.

    Stephen King!?

    Reply
    • JC2000

      I got Stephen King also. – But I’d much rather Heinlein! LOL

    • Sandra D

      awe, well I don’t know, don’t judge a book by it’s movie? I am a huge Dark Tower fan myself.

  75. Fetzy 11

    Jane austen! One of my absolute favourite authors. Nice! πŸ™‚

    Reply
  76. David Stephen Ball-Romney

    “Charles Dickens was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. Popular works include The Pickwick Papers, Great Expectations, and A Tale of Two Cities.”
    Perhaps I should enter an altered state of consciousness and discuss my thoughts on Futurism with Dickens, and see if he takes a liking to Tibetan Buddhism.

    Reply
  77. Sandra D

    I got Mary Shelley. I am reading Frankenstein (among others) right now, oddly enough. I am happy to get her, or any of the great authors, Really couldn’t fail on this. If only I was as freakishly talented as she. Awe well.

    Reply
    • retrogeegee

      I also got Mary Shelly and must confess I have never read any of her writings. I have read about her,but I am not interested in science fiction or horror stories which is the genre I consider her Frankenstein. Now I am curious to see what her writing style is like and put aside my genre distaste.

    • Sandra D

      getting into these old classic books feels like entering a different time or place. I like it a lot.

    • Lou Bernardo

      Mary is a relative on my father’s mother’s side. They both came from Jersey Isl
      and/ Sje wrote Frankenstein.

    • Davidh Digman

      I think we Mary Shelleys are a bunch of pretty, talented and innovative writers. Let us clink coffee cups together in mutual celebration!

    • Pedro Hernandez

      Hey I also got Mary Shelly! Monster loving writers gotta stick together am I right?

  78. Jean Blanchard

    I got Charles Dickens. It’s very interesting considering the influences surrounding me in my formative years: I was born in Kent, England and went to Rochester Technical School for Girls. And, of course, Charles Dickens lived in Rochester. I love Dickens but never identified myself or my writing with him.

    Reply
  79. Lorna Robinson

    I got Stephen King, strange because I don’t really like science fiction, supernatural and I would never have said horror in fact I thought I was more the airy fairy sort that sees positives and all is wonderful sort…..very interesting! Maybe i should try some horror, it might be interesting what i come up with.. the night was dark, the wind blow wind through the trees. It was icy cold, to cold to go to bed Sally thought so she sat tucked up in the lounge reading her book instead. Suddenly there was a knock on the door, she looked at the clock, who would be visiting at this time of night, on this sort of night? she wondered as she shifted the blanket, took her glasses off and settled her book so that she wouldn’t lose her page. Coming she called as she crossed the room and made her way down the passage to the front door. the knock was repeated but this time with more force and desperation. As she reached the door, she turned on the outside light, move the draught stopper that laid along the bottom of the door, she undid the catch and opened the door and inch to see who it was. To her surprise it was old mother Hubbard from down the street, she was wet and dripping so Sally quickly helped her in side and closed the door . The old lady was shaking violently and looked like she could…….15 mins up

    Reply
  80. Shauna Bolton

    Mary Shelley, an erudite, cultured Englishwoman. A versatile author of fiction and nonfiction, a prolific letter writer. A woman interested in the world, writing about what she sees and does as she travels through it. I’m flattered.

    Shelley’s style: British Romanticism
    1. emphasis upon nature
    2. interested in emotions and feelings, not just the rational mind
    3. florid prose
    4. long, complex sentences
    5. sophisticated diction
    6. interested in natural, scientific, social, domestic, and political themes
    7. Frankenstein, frame story, story within story within story, epistolary format (writing letters)

    Yet do not suppose, because I complain a little or because I can conceive a consolation for my toils which I may never know, that I am wavering in my resolutions. Those are as fixed as fate, and my voyage is only now delayed until the weather shall permit my embarkation. The winter has been dreadfully severe, but the spring promises well, and it is considered as a remarkably early season, so that perhaps I may sail sooner than I expected. I shall do nothing rashly: you know me sufficiently to confide in my prudence and considerateness whenever the safety of others is committed to my care.

    My Imitation
    To attempt to justify, or, at the very least, explain my actions, which I confess I hardly understand myself and therefore cannot elucidate satisfactorily to anyone else, would be a foolish and futile endeavor. What has been done is done, and I can do nothing other than admit that I am guilty as charged, although I steadfastly maintain that the requisite mens rea, or guilty mind, of malice toward Mr. Summersby-Price was not present at the time. Nor was that malice with me beforehand to study out how I might cause the poor man these unfortunate injuries. I freely admit that I am responsible, but not criminally. To the claims that I was careless, negligent even, I freely concede that to be true. But I did not intend murder, nor did I attempt one. If this honorable court finds me guilty of a misdemeanor, I shall resign myself to a just fate; however, I will not confess to an abhorrent criminal act, nor will I go quietly to the gallows. I shall appeal such a verdict with every instrument at my command without concern or consideration for any harm that may arise from the bull let loose in that particular china shop.

    Reply
  81. Davidh Digman

    I am Mary Shelley, apparently. Funny, I definitely see no physical resemblance. That said, I do love exploring stories of technology gone wrong, of the creation of artificial intelligence and of the ethical conundra created when we give birth to our technological babies, so maybe I am Mary Shelley after all.

    Reply
    • Sandra D

      Modern Mary Shelly. Mary S. Rebooted. πŸ˜€

  82. Bill

    I got Hemmingway. I find that surprising since I much prefer the works of dickens and Steinbeck. And many of my attempts have been science fiction themed. hmm. perhaps that’s why they’re only attempts

    Reply
  83. The Almighty

    Stephen King for the win! I am shocked, but flattered. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  84. Mary Higgins

    Jane Austen. Though my stuff has a lot more paranormal aspects to it.

    Reply
  85. Joseph Hesch

    As usual with these quizzes, I match up with Hemingway (with the occasional Vonnegut tossed in depending on my mood that day). I’m pretty satisfied with each. Thanks for the fun post.

    Reply
  86. Wanda Kiernan

    Stephen King. I was hoping for Hemingway, which I personally identify with. I like his short to the point sentences. Don’t get me wrong, I like Stephen King, too. I particularly like his suspense writing, and it would be a goal to execute a suspense story the way he does.

    Reply
  87. OkieWriter

    I got Ernest Hemingway, which is a surprise for me. Maybe I should be worried!! I never would have “thunk” that one.

    Reply
  88. Valorie Cooper

    I got Mark Twain. Strange!

    Reply
  89. Edmund Stone

    Mine was Stephen King, but since I write horror, that would be my choice anyway. My second choice would have been Hemingway or Poe. This was fun.

    Reply
  90. Birdie McGrew

    Mary Shelley, which is sort of ironic as I was inspired to become a science-fiction writer because of her. Funny.

    Reply
  91. Leanne

    I got Jane Austen..which is awesome..because she is one of my favorite writers! I studied her novel “Sense and Sensibility” quite extensively for my finals last year!!

    Reply
  92. The Original Anonymous

    I got Mary Shelley.

    Reply
  93. Sara Foust

    I got Mark Twain. I think that’s a pretty good fit. Thanks for the fun!

    Reply
  94. Claire

    I got Ernie Hemingway, who’s my all time favorite writer. I tend to write in a simple style, to the point of being somewhat minimalist, much like Hemingway did in his own writing. I loved his adventurous style, which was always depicted in his works as well as his descriptions of his characters and settings. He knew how to yank you into his stories, and that always captivated me.

    Reply
  95. Jon Duckworth

    I am somewhere between Virginia Woolfe and Mark Twain.

    Reply
  96. Jean Maples

    Charles Dickens surprises me as one whom I closest relate to. London is our place, however. I must think about this. Not Faulkner, but didn’t have the right questions.

    Reply
  97. Ken Ferry

    Kurt Vonnegut! Seriously, I wound up being teamed up with Mary Shelley, but I was forced to slelect the best of bad answers for most of the questions. Big example is genre. Mine is satire, but that wasn’t a choice in spite of Mark Twain being one of the possibilities. But, Mary Shelley? I don’t even like reading or writing si-fi, travel or drama.

    Reply
  98. Bren Van Valkenburg

    I got Virginia Woolf.

    Reply
  99. Elisa Crespo Rendon

    I got Mark Twain. Can’t figure it out because I like and write poetry and don’t like his books

    Reply
  100. Nancy Mako

    Jane Austen. Working on a fantasy in which love carves our character through various experiences the character goes through.

    Reply
  101. Edward Doney

    I got Charles Dickens…an inspiration to sit down and write more and more often.

    Reply
  102. HisHandmaiden

    Ernest Hemingway…I’ll take it! Always loved his work. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  103. Samsa Eunoia

    Whoa I got Mary Shelley. To be quite honest I have yet to read her works (especially Frankenstein, but perhaps I might get to in Brit Lit class) but I’ve read her father’s works, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and I love his poetry. Ozymandias and Mont Blanc are my favourite poems.

    Reply
  104. Felistus Senwamadi

    I got Jane Austen as well. I am an old fashioned gal (too old for my age) who writes about simple and genuine love- an absolute sucker for a good love story, but with sad and more realistic endings. Her works are also some of my favourite- pride and prejudice, of course. I love wine but I can only write drinking water. Water, love and old fashioned, I guess thats why. I hope I can modernize my writing though. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  105. Nicole Prescott

    I got Ernest Hemingway. Don’t know to much about him and his work have to do my research. This was fun

    Reply
  106. Grant McConnell

    My result was Mary Shelley. It fits because I have a darker imagination than others and I tend to look for the negative aspects of things. Most of my stories are also so dark I’m afraid to actually share them with others.

    Reply
  107. kim

    i got mary shelley frankensteins daughter

    Reply
  108. drjeane

    I’ve discovered Mary Shelley. I identified immediately with the phrase, “She loved words and travel.” Having just completed a travel book with my husband, I’m looking forward to reading Shelley’s Rambles in Germany and Italy.

    Reply
  109. AJ - Raalte

    LOL Stephen King. Couldn’t be more wrong, I think.

    Reply
  110. Faami Shail

    I got Stephen hawking…. really?? Haha

    Reply
  111. Faami Shail

    I got Stephen king… really ???
    Haha

    Reply
  112. bernadette

    MaryShelley, lol. Well, a lot of my characters Are monsters…

    Reply
  113. Connie Hall

    Ernest Hemingway…wow…would not have thought that. My research says he uses one and two syllable words most often. Maybe I should experiment with that.

    Reply

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